Tag:SEC
Posted on: March 1, 2012 6:42 pm
 

Sources: Florida not ready to end LSU series

While LSU athletic director Joe Alleva said that the Tigers and Florida are both “interested in ending” their annual series, Florida sources told CBSSports.com that the Gators have given no indication they want their series to end with LSU.

The Tigers and Gators have met annually since 1971 and were designated as permanent cross-divisional rivals when the SEC expanded in 1992. With the addition of Missouri and Texas A&M, the league is considering doing away with the cross-divisional games, including Florida-LSU, Auburn-Georgia and Alabama-Tennessee.

Alleva told the Baton Rouge (La.) Advocate the Tigers and Gators were interested in ending their series, but Florida sources disputed that to CBSSports.com.

Florida athletic director Jeremy Foley could not be reached for comment Thursday.

Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity also told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that there’s a possibility the Bulldogs’ rivalry with Auburn, which dates back to 1892, could be in jeopardy.


Category: NCAAF
Posted on: March 1, 2012 2:13 pm
 

SEC loves (playing) the Sun Belt

While Thursday’s release of the Sun Belt’s 2012 football schedule didn’t bring as much fanfare as the SEC or Big 12 schedule release, it did give us a chance to look at which other conferences love the Sun Belt. Specifically which of the other 10 FBS conferences love playing against the Sun Belt.

And no one loves playing/beating the Sun Belt more than the SEC, especially Mississippi State.

Three of the Bulldogs' four non-conference games are against Sun Belt members Troy, South Alabama and Middle Tennessee. Their fourth non-conference game is against FCS member Jackson State. I guess there were no Division III teams available that week.

Anyway, Mississippi State is among nine SEC schools that will play Sun Belt schools this fall in a total of 12 non-conference games. The only SEC schools without a Sun Belt team on the schedule is Missouri, Ole Miss, South Carolina, Texas A&M and Vanderbilt. Defending national champion Alabama’s schedule features two Sun Belt opponents: Western Kentucky and Florida Atlantic.

After the SEC, Conference USA has the most schools (six) playing Sun Belt opponents with a total of eight games.

Mississippi State is one of five schools with multiple Sun Belt opponents. Alabama, Memphis, Tulane and Navy each have two Sun Belt non-conference games.

The only FBS league that isn’t playing the Sun Belt is the WAC.

Last year, the Sun Belt was only 10-25 in non-conference games against FBS opponents, including a 1-2 bowl record.

Conference (games vs. Sun Belt)

ACC (3):
Duke, Georgia Tech, N.C. State
Big East (1):
Louisville
Big 10 (1):
Nebraska
Big 12 (3):
Baylor, Kansas State, Oklahoma State
C-USA (6):
Houston, Memphis 2, Southern Miss, Tulane 2, UAB, UCF
Independents (1):
Navy 2
MAC (1):
Akron
Mountain West (1):
Hawaii
SEC (9):
Alabama 2, Arkansas, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi State 3, Tennessee
Pac-12 (1):
Oregon
WAC (0)

Posted on: February 23, 2012 10:54 am
 

MWC continues to wait on AQ BCS exemption

DALLAS – While the Mountain West finally knows exactly who will be playing in the league this season, the MWC may have to wait seven more months before knowing if it will be an automatic qualifying BCS league in the next two seasons.

In December, the Mountain West applied for a BCS exemption, which would allow the league champion to receive an automatic bid to one of the BCS bowls. The exemption must be voted on by the 12-member Presidential Oversight Committee, with nine votes needed for approval.

That committee, which consists of a president from each of the 11 Football Bowl Subdivision conferences and Notre Dame’s president, doesn’t appear in any rush to rule on the Mountain West’s AQ status.

BCS executive director Bill Hancock told CBSSports.com Wednesday that the BCS will continue to try to get the Presidential Oversight Committee together on a conference call, but Hancock said there is no immediate deadline when the committee would vote and one may not be conducted until the start of the season, in late August or early September.

On Dec. 13, 2011, the Mountain West filed an exemption, claiming it met the necessary requirements to earn its champion an automatic berth to one of the five BCS bowls.

In its four-page letter to the Oversight Committee, the Mountain West stated that “important factors are at the core of the Committee’s consideration of this request for an exemption – precedent and performance. The BCS has a well-established history of granting automatic qualification exemptions. Equally important, the performance of the Mountain West during the evaluation period has clearly been deserving of automatic-qualifying status.”

The Mountain West claims the Big East was granted BCS access and kept its AQ without meeting qualification standards in February 2004 “apparently based on reputation and relationships, rather than demonstrated performance.”

Despite having only seven members for the 2004 season, after the departures of Miami and Virginia Tech to the ACC, the Big East retained its AQ status from 2004-07.

“It is only appropriate that the Mountain West's exemption request be considered in that context and a consistency of approach be maintained,” the league wrote to the committee.

Because the Mountain West, along with Conference USA, is dissolving and forming a new league in 2013, Mountain West commissioner Craig Thompson told CBSSports.com the Presidential Oversight Committee recently requested information regarding those plans for the new conference.

“We are in the process of answering,” Thompson said.

Because the Mountain West will be an entirely different league in 2013, Hancock said he doesn’t know if the MWC would receive AQ status in both the 2012 and 2013 seasons.

“No one knows about that,” Hancock said. “They might or might not. That would have to be revisited.”

The Mountain West met two of the three criteria for an exemption and were just outside at No. 7 in the third (needing to be ranked among the top six conferences in overall strength of the league based on the computer polls). The ACC and Big East also fell short of the threshold to retain their automatic qualification status after the four-year evaluation cycle (2008-2011), but aren’t being evaluated against these same standards. In fact, the Big East’s numbers wouldn’t even qualify it to request an exemption. 

Thompson said Wednesday he would characterize the Mountain West’s chances “as neutral right now.”

“TCU and West Virginia’s moves (to the Big 12 from the Mountain West and Big East, respectively) really effects three leagues, although two have AQ status,” Thompson said. “That shows the volatility of the college landscape.”

That landscape continues shifting and changing – sometimes on a weekly basis. While the Big East wouldn’t pay Boise State’s exit fees to leave the Mountain West this season, the Mountain West won’t technically exist next season. It will have totally new membership and a new name.

The Big East, which is close to adding Temple for the 2012 season, also will have a new look with anywhere from 11 to 13 members in 2013, depending if Pittsburgh and Syracuse leave early for the ACC. The Big 12, currently set for 10 members in 2012, could decide to expand for the 2013 season.

And who knows what else might happen involving conference realignment in the next 12-18 months?

One thing is certain: if the Mountain West is granted an exemption for the next two seasons, it would be mean one fewer team would qualify for an at-large spot in one of the five BCS bowls during the next two seasons.

If the MWC earns an exemption, the champions from the Pac-12, Big Ten, SEC, ACC, Big 12, Big East and MWC would all earn automatic berths to the BCS bowls. The remaining three spots would be filled by at-large selections, reducing the number of conferences with potentially two BCS bowl teams from four to three.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 5:13 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 5:54 pm
 

Big Ten's Delany on SEC: "They've dominated"

NEW YORK – The following is a public service announcement about the Southeastern Conference from – huh, what’s this? – Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany?

Delany was asked Thursday if the SEC wields too much power in college football today.

“Whatever credibility they have sort of developed, it’s on the field in our system,” Delany said. “And they’ve had great athletes and some great coaches and together, over a period of over half a decade, they’ve dominated at the elite level.”

The SEC has won five consecutive BCS national titles and has clinched a sixth with SEC rivals LSU and Alabama meeting for the BCS championship on Jan. 9 in New Orleans.

“I think they’ve earned it and they’ve deserved it,” Delany said. “When there’s a benefit of the doubt, I think it’s very natural for them to get it. Until you beat them on the field, in the system, they deserve that benefit.

“Who deserves it more than the reigning champion? You have to beat the champion, whether that’s in heavyweight prize fighting or in the BCS. When all things are equal, I think you have to lean toward the entity that has produced the result over time.”




Category: NCAAF
Posted on: October 26, 2011 2:41 pm
Edited on: October 26, 2011 2:48 pm
 

How close did Big 12 come to adding WVU?

How close was the Big 12 to announcing West Virginia as its newest member?

As of Tuesday, Big 12 officials, including interim commissioner Chuck Neinas and deputy commissioner Tim Weiser, planned to be in Morgantown, W.Va. today to announce West Virginia was headed to the Big 12.

The Big 12 had told West Virginia officials the Mountaineers were the choice to replace Missouri and the Big 12 even had a press release prepared.

But before the Big 12 could make it official, the league’s board of directors wanted to perform due diligence and decided to hold off on officially inviting West Virginia.

The reason was simple: the Big 12 had always been deciding between West Virginia, Louisville or BYU as a replacement for Missouri, when it leaves for the SEC. Now the league is split between West Virginia and Louisville, multiple sources have said.

The New York Times reported Wednesday that it’s “too close to call” between West Virginia and Louisville. The West Virginia Metro News reported the Big 12 told West Virginia officials the Big 12 board would vote on which school to add perhaps as early as Monday.

Also, the multiple reports that indicated Big East commissioner John Marinatto would meet with Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowksy and Mountain West commissioner Craig Thompson today "were not accurate," Big East spokesman John Paquette told CBSSports.com Tuesday. Paquette also reiterated today that Marinatto did not meet today Banowsky and Thompson.

C-USA and the MWC hope to merge with the Big East in some fashion to obtain a BCS automatic qualifying bid. However, the Big East still plans on forming a 12-team football league with the addition of Boise State, Navy, Air Force, UCF, Houston and SMU to join USF, UConn, Rutgers, Cincinnati and either Louisville or West Virginia.

The Big East would have to seek another school to replace West Virginia or Louisville. Temple would be the most likely candidate, but the possible new Western members are interested in pursuing BYU to replace WVU or UL.


Posted on: October 18, 2011 10:25 am
Edited on: October 18, 2011 2:43 pm
 

Big East talks expansion; contacts UH, SMU

Officials at Houston and SMU have both been contacted by Big East commissioner John Marinatto and have been told the league wants to discuss with them further about joining the league, sources told CBSSports.com.

The Houston Chronicle reported Monday night that Houston had been extended an invitation. However, league sources said no official invitations have been extended to any teams. The Big East also released a statement Saturday that no invitations have been extended.

On Tuesday afternoon, Marinatto held a media teleconference, but would not identify specific schools but did admit he's had preliminary discussions with several schools.

Those schools are Boise State, Navy, Air Force, UCF, Houston and SMU, sources said.

Marinatto said he's confident the Big East will remain an automatic qualifying BCS conference when the new cycle begins in 2014 and didn't provide a timetable on adding teams to replace TCU, Pittsburgh and Syracuse.

"Stay tuned," he said. "We're not rushing ourselves to meet anyone's deadline. The sooner, the better."

Marinatto reiterated that the Big East would not allow Pittsburgh or Syracuse to leave the league early and must honor the 27-month exit agreement. Pitt and Syracuse will remain in the Big East through June 30, 2014, meaning the Big East could have a 14-team football league in 2013 if necessary, Marinatto said.

A college football industry source indicated the fact the ACC has to wait until then is not a big deal to the league. "It just gives the ACC more time to get organized and get their schedules set," the source said.

On Monday night, the Big East’s presidents and chancellors voted unanimously to increase the league’s exit fee to $10 million, but the increased fee is contingent on either Navy or Air Force joining the league as football only members, sources told CBSSports.com.

Marinatto confirmed the increase in the exit fee, but would not identify the school that would trigger the increased exit fee.

The increased exit fees from $5 million to $10 million for the football schools were something Navy and Air Force wanted before committing to the Big East.

"I don't think anyone will be blindsided or feel bushwhacked when this process is complete," Marinatto said.

Navy, Air Force and Boise State are interested to joining the Big East because of the league's automatic qualifying BCS status, but wanted a bigger financial commitment from the remaining members (Cincinnati, UConn, Louisville, Rutgers, South Florida and West Virginia).

Sources said Houston and SMU – along with UCF – are prepared to accept an invitation to join the Big East as all sports members once an official invitation is extended.

UCF met with Marinatto and other Big East representatives in Cincinnati on Friday. Boise State officials spoke via telephone with the Big East on Thursday.

Marinatto is in the process of scheduling a meeting with Houston and SMU officials in the coming days in New York, sources said.

The Big East wants to get to 12 football teams with the addition of Navy, Air Force and Boise State as football-only members and Houston, SMU and UCF as all-sports members.

However, the Big East still could lose a school if Missouri leaves for the SEC. The New York Times reported Monday night that Missouri’s departure from the Big 12 to the SEC is “inevitable and imminent.” If so, the Big 12 could target either Louisville or West Virginia or even add both teams. BYU also remains an expansion candidate for the Big 12.

Marinatto said the Big East would move quickly in expanding and "is not going to pause" and wait on "the Missouri situation."

Marinatto also said he has not been contacted by any other conferences interested in any Big East schools since TCU left for the Big 12. When the league gets to 12 schools, Marinatto said it's a possibility the Big East could hold its football championship game in New York, similar to the Big East basketball tournament.

Posted on: October 17, 2011 9:25 pm
Edited on: October 17, 2011 9:46 pm
 

Big East fee increase depends on Navy, Air Force

The Big East’s presidents and chancellors voted unanimously Monday night to increase the league’s exit fee to $10 million, but the increased fee is contingent on Navy and Air Force joining the league as football only members, sources told CBSSports.com.

The increase in exit fees from $5 million to $10 million is expected to increase the probability of adding Navy and Air Force as football-only members. Both schools are receptive to joining the Big East, but wanted a bigger financial commitment from the remaining members (Cincinnati, UConn, Louisville, Rutgers, South Florida and West Virginia).

Sources with knowledge of Monday's teleconference also said that there is no timetable to issue invitations. The Big East previously had indicated a desire to get to 12 football members after losing TCU to the Big 12 and Pittsburgh and Syracuse to the ACC.

Less than an hour before the Big East’s presidents and chancellors held their teleconference Monday night with Commissioner John Marinatto, the New York Times reported Missouri’s departure from the Big 12 to the SEC was “inevitable and imminent.”

That development would have a significant impact on the league, specifically Big East members Louisville and West Virginia, who sources have told CBSSports.com are prime candidates to receive a Big 12 invitation if Missouri left. However, all of the Big East’s 14 members still voted unanimously for the increased exit fee Monday night.

Besides Navy and Air Force, the Big East also has had conversations with Boise State about becoming a football-only member and with UCF about joining as an all sports member.

As of Saturday, the Big East “felt confident about their discussions with Boise State,” a college football industry source told CBSSports.com.

“That’s the most important factor, the stability of the core membership,” Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk told CBSSports.com Monday night.

Gladchuk said that the possibility of adding Boise State was significant in Navy’s decision making process. “Absolutely,” Gladchuk said. “Anything that helps stabilize the Big East’s automatic BCS berth.”

Boise State president Bob Kustra told the Idaho Statesman Saturday the Broncos have notified the Mountain West Conference that it is definitely staying or leaving the league.

“If by some strange chance somebody came to us and said we’d like to invite you to join our conference, I’d have to say, ‘Well, you’ll have to give us time to do our due diligence and really spend the time on it.’ We’re not ready,” Kustra told the Statesman. “I have no idea how fast or slow this whole process is going to move.”

Last week Boise State coach Chris Petersen said he was not concerned about the extra travel that would be required by competing in the Big East.

“For us, it’s not that big of a deal (with) how we travel,” Petersen told the Statesman. “You get on a plane, you charter. You’re in and out. You’re on a plane four hours instead of two. Whatever. All that’s doable.

“Do all the other things make sense? And I think that, don’t kid yourself, these guys (Kustra and interim athletic director Curt Apsey) are all over it. They’re analyzing everything.”

UCF is ready to join the Big East, multiple sources told CBSSports.com, and is just awaiting an official invitation to the league.

UCF officials met with Marinatto and other Big East representatives Friday in Cincinnati. “We were very impressed with them,” a league source said. “It went well. I can’t imagine it dragging out too long with them.”

The league also is targeting Houston and SMU as potential all-sports members to get to 12 football members. If the Big East lost any schools to the Big 12 or other conferences, the next likely candidates the Big East would pursue would be Temple and East Carolina.
Posted on: October 17, 2011 7:25 pm
Edited on: October 17, 2011 8:58 pm
 

Big 12 on Mizzou move to SEC: "Wait and see"

Missouri's departure from the Big 12 to the SEC is "inevitable and imminent," the New York Times reported Monday night, but Big 12 interim commissioner Chuck Neinas told CBSSports.com's Dennis Dodd "I guess we'll wait and see."

"I have not heard anything different," Neinas told CBSSports.com. "I really have no comment. I have not heard anything. I have not read the New York Times story. That's all I can tell you."

The Times, quoting a college official with direct knowledge of the situation, said no specific timetable has been set. However, Missouri’s Board of Curators will meet on Thursday in Kansas City, Mo., where the process of withdrawing from the Big 12 and applying to the SEC is expected to begin, the Times reported.

Neinas told Dodd he understood the Board of Curators meeting were "regularly scheduled meetings, not a special meeting," Neinas said. "They're looking for a new systems president."

On Saturday, Oklahoma State president Burns Hargis told CBSSports.com Big 12 officials did not know whether Missouri would stay in the Big 12.

Hargis also told CBSSports.com the league's presidents would engage in "serious conversations" in the next two weeks whether to remain at 10 schools or return to 12 schools. Oklahoma State and Oklahoma prefer 12 members, while Texas prefers 10 members. However, officials from all three schools stress they just want the best model that assures long-term stability.

Neinas said recently that Missouri would remain in the league in 2012, no matter what the Tigers decision was regarding the SEC. However, a source told CBSSports.com last week that it was still "very possible" if Missouri left the Big 12, it could begin play in the SEC next season along with Texas A&M.

Neinas said last week he told SEC commissioner Mike Slive “if you’re going to extend an invitation to Missouri please let me know.”

Missouri's decision to leave for the SEC could have a major impact on the Big East Conference, whose presidents and chancellors were scheduled to hold an 8 p.m. teleconference to approve an increase in its exit fees from $5 million to $10 million.

Louisville and West Virginia would be leading candidates for the Big 12, but league sources told CBSSports.com Monday afternoon both schools would support increasing the league's exit fees. That was, however, before the Times' report Monday night that Missouri was headed to the SEC.



 
 
 
 
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