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Tag:Ohio State
Posted on: January 18, 2012 4:32 pm
Edited on: January 18, 2012 4:39 pm
 

Texas A&M, Notre Dame most overrated in 2011

Now that the 2011 college football season is finally completed – Bobby Hebert’s done ranting about Les Miles, right? – let’s take a look at how smart or, make that clueless,  the voters in the Associated Press poll were before the season.

I was one of the 60 voters that participated in the AP poll. Each summer we’re asked to produce a Top 25 out of thin air. And then come January, we discover we’re usually as accurate as a non-fiction piece from James Frey.

Surprisingly, though, this year we did a fairly decent job of predicting the future or, if you prefer, the teams did a decent job of living up to their preseason rankings.

First the good.

We nailed it! Of the AP’s preseason Top 25 teams, three schools – No. 7 Stanford, No. 14 TCU and No. 19 Georgia – finished with the same ranking in the final AP poll.

Missed it by this much: Of the remaining 22 teams ranked in the preseason, we were off by only three spots or less on six schools: Alabama (preseason No. 2, finished No. 1), Oregon (preseason No. 3, finished No. 4), LSU (preseason No. 4, finished No. 2), Boise State (preseason No. 5, finished No. 8), Wisconsin (preseason No. 10, finished No. 11) and South Carolina (preseason No. 12, finished No. 9).

At this point I’d like to mention of the preseason top 19 teams, nearly half (nine) finished within three spots in the final AP rankings. Not bad. Which brings me too …

Wow, were we wrong: Of the remaining 16 teams ranked in the preseason Top 25, nine schools finished in the final Top 25, but were nowhere close to their preseason rankings. No. 1 Oklahoma finished 16th, No. 6 Florida State finished 23rd, No. 9 Oklahoma State finished third, No. 10 Nebraska finished No. 24, No. 13 Virginia Tech finished No. 21, No. 15 Arkansas finished fifth, No. 17 Michigan State finished 11th, No. 24 West Virginia finished No. 17 and No. 25 USC finished No. 6.

That leaves seven schools that were ranked in the preseason Top 25 but plummeted out of the rankings by season’s end because (take your pick) they choked under the pressure of a preseason Top 25 ranking, didn’t deserve to be ranked, were overrated, underachieved or all of the above.

We/they totally blew it: Here they are: the not-so-Magnificent Seven teams that were ranked in the preseason Top 25 but ended the season outside the Top 25. No. 8 Texas A&M, No. 16 Notre Dame, No. 18 Ohio State, No. 20 Mississippi State, No. 21 Missouri, No. 22 Florida and No. 23 Auburn all finished out of the Top 25.

We never saw them coming: There were 48 schools that received at least one vote in the preseason Top 25 poll. Yet, there were four schools that did not receive a single preseason vote that still finished in the final top 25: Baylor (finishing No. 13), Kansas State (finishing No. 15), Clemson (finishing No. 22) and Cincinnati (finishing No. 25).

Three other schools received Top 25 preseason votes and were not in the preseason Top 25 but finished in the AP final poll: No. 12 Michigan, No. 18 Houston and No. 20 Southern Miss.

So who were the biggest surprises and disappointments of 2011? Look no further than the Big 12, which had the nation's two most pleasant surprises in Baylor and Kansas State and the nation's biggest disappointment in Texas A&M.

Based on their AP preseason rankings, the biggest surprises in 2011: Baylor, Kansas State, Clemson (yes, even with the Orange Bowl seal-clubbing), Michigan, Cincinnati, USC and Houston. The biggest disappointments: Texas A&M, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Mississippi State, Florida, Arizona State, Miami, Utah, Iowa, Florida State, N.C. State and Oklahoma.

Listed below are the 48 schools that received a vote in the preseason Top 25 and the difference of how many spots better (+) or worse (-) it finished in the final Top 25 rankings. Following the school is each team’s preseason and final ranking. If a school started unranked and finished unranked, it was considered starting/finishing at No. 49.

Diff School (Pre-Final ranking)
+36 Baylor (NR-13)
+34 Kansas State (NR-15)
+27 Clemson (NR-22)
+26 Michigan (38-12)
+24 Cincinnati (NR-25)
+19 USC (25-6)
+18 Houston (36-18)
+15 Virginia (NR-34)
+11 Southern Miss (31-20)
+13 Northern Illinois (41-28)
+10 Arkansas (15-5)
+7 West Virginia (24-17)
+7 Brigham Young (33-26)
+6 Oklahoma State (9-3)
+6 Michigan State (17-11)
+3 South Carolina (12-9)
+2 LSU (4-2)
+1 Alabama (2-1)
+1 Wisconsin (11-10)
0 Stanford (7-7)
0 TCU (14-14)
0 Georgia (19-19)
-1 Oregon (3-4)
-3 Boise State (5-8)
-3 Nevada (46-NR)
-3 Northwestern (46-NR)
-3 Washington (46-NR)
-4 Auburn (23-27)
-4 Texas (26-30)
-5 Arizona (44-NR)
-5 Maryland (44-NR)
-6 Penn State (27-33)
-6 Tulsa (43-NR)
-8 Virginia Tech (13-21)
-8 Missouri (21-29)
-8 Hawaii (41-NR)
-9 UCF (40-NR) 5
-10 Tennessee (39-NR)
-12 Pittsburgh (37-NR)
-14 Nebraska (10-24)
-14 Air Force (35-NR)
-15 Oklahoma (1-16)
-16 N.C. State (33-NR)
-17 Florida State (6-23)
-17 Iowa (32-NR)
-19 Utah (30-NR) 25
-20 Miami (29-NR)
-21 Arizona State (28-NR)
-27 Florida (22-NR)
-29 Mississippi State (20-NR)
-31 Ohio State (18-NR)
-33 Notre Dame (16-NR)
-41 Texas A&M (8-NR)



Posted on: January 17, 2012 6:10 pm
 

Miami has biggest presence in NFL playoffs

Of the NFL's four teams playing in Sunday's AFC and NFC championships, the University of Miami has the most former players on those teams' rosters and injured reserve.

There are a combined 11 former Hurricanes playing for New England, Baltimore, San Francisco and the New York Giants, followed by five colleges represented by seven players each: Ohio State, Oregon, Pittsburgh, Rutgers and Texas.
Posted on: January 9, 2012 2:34 pm
Edited on: January 9, 2012 2:36 pm
 

USF DC Snyder headed to Texas A&M

NEW ORLEANS - South Florida defensive coordinator Mark Snyder is leaving to become Texas A&M's defensive coordinator, sources told CBSSports.com.

Footballscoop.com first reported Snyder's departure.

Snyder joins the staff at Texas A&M under new coach Kevin Sumlin. Snyder spent the past two seasons as USF's defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. Before that, he was head coach at Marshall for five seasons from 2005-09 and an assistant for seven seasons at Ohio State and Minnesota.



Posted on: November 28, 2011 12:37 pm
Edited on: November 28, 2011 12:37 pm
 

Urban Meyer: "I went off the deep end"

TAMPA, Fla. – On Oct. 12 back when Urban Meyer was still retired from coaching and just a television analyst, he was in Tampa to speak at an Outback Bowl function.

Chris Sullivan, founder and director of Outback Steakhouse, walked up to Meyer inside the Belvedere Ballroom in the A La Carte Event Pavilion and embraced his friend.

“What are you doing next?” Sullivan said. “We could sure use you.”

Sullivan is a Kentucky graduate. Of course, Meyer will not be coaching at Kentucky, he is headed to Ohio State.

Less than a year after "retiring," Meyer is back

Seven weeks ago I asked Meyer what it would take for him to return to coaching.

“If I ever went back, I'd have to get back a little bit of balance I used to have,” Meyer said. “I don't know if I'm there yet. I went off the deep end. When I first went to Florida, my first Tennessee game, first SEC game, my son (Nathan) was playing that (Friday) night and was going to pitch.

“I'm in a hotel. I looked at the police officers: ‘I can't take this. Will you get in a car and drive me to go watch my son pitch?’ Everybody thought I was nuts.

“I'm not going to let a job consume me. I think it did. I would have never done that at the end. I was so consumed about perfection. We created a monster. If I ever did get back, I would not let that control my life”

Meyer is now officially back under the brightest of spotlights, replacing Jim Tressel and interim coach Luke Fickell at Ohio State.

After the 2009 season, Meyer took a three-month leave of absence. The following a 7-5 regular season in 2010, Meyer announced his retirement from coaching on Dec. 8 because of health concerns and he wanted to spend more time with his family.

Meyer said then he had suffered chest pains and severe headaches, related to stress.

So how will he be able – as he says – not let the job control his life?

“It's discipline, personal discipline,” Meyer said on Oct. 12. “You've got to hire great people, but I can blame everybody else I want. At the end of the day, you have to have discipline: go work out, eat right, still have balance in your life.

“What I've experienced, because I do a lot of public speaking now, I don't think I'm a lone wolf that has that issue. Guys right here have that issue, balancing that. You can blame your job, you can blame your boss or you can blame the media. At the end of the day, it's you that has to take a hold of that thing. I didn't do that.”

In six seasons at Florida, Meyer was 65-15. He won national championships in 2006 and 2008. His final game was a 37-24 victory against Penn State in last season’s Outback Bowl, which turned out to be the final bowl game for Joe Paterno.

Now Paterno is out of coaching and Meyer is back in.



Posted on: September 1, 2011 5:10 pm
Edited on: September 1, 2011 5:43 pm
 

Ohio State suspends 3 key players for Akron game

Ohio State suspended starting running back/punt returner Jordan Hall and starting cornerback Travis Howard and back-up cornerback Corey Brown for Saturday's game with Akron for receiving impermissible benefits of $300 or less each at a charity event they attended earlier this year.

The Buckeyes already were without RB Dan Herron, WR Devier Posey, OL Mike Adams and DL Solomon Thomas, part of last year's infamous Tattoo Five. Those four plus former QB Terrelle Pryor were allowed to play in last season's Sugar Bowl and had their suspensions delayed until this year. Also, LB Jordan Whiting had been previously suspended for the Akron game.

According to the school Ohio State's actions were "consistent with past practice" and "the university immediately reviewed this information and self-reported the infractions to the NCAA and the Big Ten."

Ohio State has filed for the players' reinstatement for the remainder of the 2011 season, but the university said it also is considering institutional sanctions for these student-athletes.

"We take this matter seriously," Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said in a statement. "Our commitment to institutional integrity is steadfast, and we must hold everyone associated with our athletics programs accountable for lapses in judgment.  We believe in transparency with the NCAA, all regulatory bodies and all of Buckeye Nation."

The university, which self-reported the violations, said it will have no further comment on the violations.

Posted on: August 3, 2011 9:18 am
 

Big East move should help keep Patterson at TCU

NEWPORT, R.I. – Besides all the obvious benefits of TCU’s move to the Big East – money, better BCS bowl access, money, more television exposure, money and money – another plus for the Horned Frogs is it could make it easier to keep Gary Patterson in Fort Worth.

Patterson has been mentioned as a candidate for multiple openings in past years, but has remained at TCU. He begins his 12th season with the Horned Frogs on Sept. 2 against Baylor. The Horned Frogs are playing their final season in the Mountain West before moving to the Big East next season.

“Gary has an opportunity to create his own shadow,” TCU athletic director Chris Del Conte said. “You can go somewhere else and you’re following some one else’s footsteps.

“You go to Alabama, it’s still Bear Bryant. You go to Texas, it’s still Darrell Royal. You go to Arkansas, it’s Frank Broyles. It’s still Woody Hayes at Ohio [State] and Bo Schembechler at Michigan. Gary is that figure for us. He is our iconic figure.”

The Horned Frogs are in the process of $105 million expansion and renovation of Amon Carter Stadium. It’s scheduled to be completed for the 2012 season. That’s only one piece of the puzzle, Del Conte said.

“The one thing we have to continue to do is invest in facilities, invest in staff and invest in our program,” Del Conte said. “But Gary’s created that iconic figure for us. That’s something to be said.

“The grass isn’t always greener. That whole field is riddled with people who thought it was greener and they’re now skeletons littered in the weeds.”

The Horned Frogs first game in the renovated Carter Stadium in 2012 will be against Grambling on Sept. 8. TCU’s first season as a Big East member also will include home games against Oklahoma, Virginia, Cincinnati, Louisville, South Florida and West Virginia and road games at Pittsburgh, UConn, Rutgers and Syracuse.

Even though the Horned Frogs aren’t members of the Big East yet, Del Conte has an opinion on the league's expansion.

“Whatever we do, you have to have significant value to the mosaic that is already there,” Del Conte said. “If not, keep the league at what it’s at. Nine, 10, 12 [teams] – I have no dog in that race. Our forefathers do. My opinion is you have to add significant value and preserve the Big East’s tradition and history in basketball and what Dave Gavitt created way back in the day.”

Del Conte said he’s confident a Big East team will be playing for a national championship – in football – in the very near future and referenced near misses by Cincinnati in 2009 (if Texas doesn’t edge Nebraska in the Big 12 title game) and West Virginia in 2007 (if the Mountaineers defeat Pitt in regular season finale).

“There will be a Big East team playing in the national championship game soon enough,” Del Conte said. “There will be.”

Posted on: July 8, 2011 5:24 pm
 

Ohio State's penalties won't be financial

By playing in the Sugar Bowl, Ohio State earned the Big Ten Conference $6 million as the league’s second BCS bowl team. And Ohio State and the league will keep every penny since the BCS has no power to impose any financial penalties on the Buckeyes.

“The BCS is not a governance body nor an investigative body,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock told CBSSports.com. “Policy is that the BCS group would act only at the conclusion of the NCAA process, and only if the NCAA returns findings.”

On Friday, Ohio State vacated all of its 2010 victories, including the 31-26 win against Arkansas, and put itself on two years probation. Jim Tressel, who covered up and lied about multiple NCAA violations, left the school on May 30. A handful of players have been suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season (but were allowed by the NCAA to play in the Sugar Bowl).

Ohio State will go before the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions next month. Further penalties are possible – just not financial ones.

The NCAA Committee on Infractions cannot withhold bowl money from a football program for committing major NCAA violations.

"The key here is unlike NCAA championships, where if you have to vacate a Final Four [appearance], the Committee on Infractions and NCAA can mandate that you as an institution return monies to the NCAA,” said Joe D’Antonio, the Big East’s senior associate commissioner for compliance. “The BCS is not controlled by the NCAA. Consequently the Committee on Infractions cannot impose those types of [financial] penalties.”



Posted on: July 8, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Presenting NCAA's most frequent cheaters club

As our series on college football’s cheaters continues today, I looked at the most frequent cheaters – at least in terms of major infractions – since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

It’s a neck-and-neck race between Alabama and Texas Tech, with three major infractions each.

There are also a dozen teams – Cal, Colorado, Florida International, Florida State, Illinois, Minnesota, Mississippi State, Oklahoma, SMU, Texas A&M, USC and Washington – with two infractions each

Here are the remaining 42 teams with one major infraction each: Arkansas, Arkansas State, Arizona State, Auburn, Ball State, Baylor, Central Florida, Cincinnati, Clemson, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Houston, Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky, Louisiana Lafayette, Marshall, Maryland, Memphis, Miami, Michigan, Michigan State, Mississippi, New Mexico, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Oklahoma State, Oregon, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, San Diego State, South Carolina, Syracuse, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, UTEP, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Washington State and Wisconsin.

In all 56 of the 120 FBS programs have committed a major infraction in the past 25 years, including nearly two-thirds of the automatic qualifying BCS programs.

By the way, I loved a response on Twitter from @FGrimes1 – listed as Forrest Grimes – defending Texas Tech’s three major infractions. He wrote: “Most of Techs major infractions came around the same time, way to make Tech look like a contuinously dirty program a--hole."

For Mr. Grimes’ information, Tech’s violations were not at the same time – but spaced more than 10 years apart in 1987, 1998 and on Jan. 7, 2011 – during Grimes’ current semester as a journalism major at Tech

While our two-week series is looking at whether schools can win without cheating, I think it’s important to recognize the 23 AQ BCS programs that have not committed a major infraction since 1987 … so far.

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida, West Virginia.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com