Tag:North Carolina
Posted on: February 3, 2012 12:36 pm
Edited on: February 3, 2012 4:37 pm
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ACC ready for Pitt, Syracuse. But when?

Pittsburgh and Syracuse may not be leaving the Big East for the ACC for another two years, but the Panthers and Orange know now which ACC divisions they’ll be in. Pittsburgh will compete in the ACC’s Coastal Division, while Syracuse will be in the ACC’s Atlantic Division, the ACC’s athletic directors voted Friday.

The ACC also voted to increase its league football schedule from eight to nine conference games when the Panthers and Orange come on board.

Pittsburgh and Syracuse aren’t scheduled to join the ACC until July 1, 2014. However, that timetable could get moved up depending on if West Virginia is allowed to leave the Big East early for the Big 12. West Virginia is trying to join the Big 12 this fall, while the Big East is trying to make the Mountaineers honor the league’s exit agreement and stay until June 30, 2014.

Pittsburgh and Syracuse have not indicated they would pursue legal action, like West Virginia has, to leave the Big East before 2014, but sources told CBSSports.com that both schools are monitoring West Virginia’s situation and would try to join the ACC early if the Mountaineers are able to leave before 2014.

ACC commissioner John Swofford wouldn’t speculate on Pittsburgh and Syracuse joining the ACC before 2014. “First of all, (that decision) is between Pitt and Syracuse and the Big East,” Swofford said.

However, if the Panthers and Orange can leave before 2014, the ACC will be ready.

“The fact we made our decision how we will schedule and compete certainly helps us (when they join),” Swofford said. “In terms of when that time may come, I don’t want to get into a hypothetical of this or that. Our position continues to be that we want to prepare ourselves when they’re ready and it’s appropriate for them to join us.”

If West Virginia leaves the Big East before 2014, it will likely have to pay a substantial financial penalty to the Big East. Swofford would not speculate whether the ACC would assist Pitt and Syracuse financially to assist them if they were able to leave the Big East early.

The ACC is expected to announce its 2012 football schedule in the next two weeks, so even if WVU and the Big East settles in the coming days it's unlikely Pitt and Syracuse would be able to join for the 2012-13 school year. Before the 2013 season is a more realisitic possibility.

Whenever they do get to the ACC, Pittsburgh will join Miami, Georgia Tech, Duke, North Carolina, Virginia and Virginia Tech in the Coastal Division. Syracuse will join Clemson, Florida State, N.C. State, Boston College, Maryland and Wake Forest in the Atlantic.

The current primary crossover partners will remain consistent with Syracuse and Pitt becoming primary crossover partners with each other.

When Pitt and Syracuse join the ACC, the league will play a nine-game conference football schedule. The format will consist of each team playing all six in its division each year, plus its primary crossover partner each year and two rotating opponents from the opposite division.

“We’ve been evaluating (eight or nine-game league schedules) since back in the fall,” Swofford said. “We want to see and play each other as much as reasonably possible.”

Swofford also said that adding conference television inventory (more ACC games) also was beneficial.

This six-year cycle allows each team to play each divisional opponent and its primary crossover partner six times (three home and three away) while also playing each rotating crossover opponent two times (one home and one away).

In basketball, the ACC will play an 18-game conference schedule beginning in the 2012-13 school year.

After Pitt and Syracuse join, each school will have one primary partner (Boston College and Syracuse; Clemson and Georgia Tech; Duke and North Carolina; Florida State and Miami; Maryland and Pitt; N.C. State and Wake Forest; Virginia and Virginia Tech).

The scheduling model will be based on a three-year cycle during which teams will play every league opponent at least once with the primary partners playing home and away annually while the other 12 rotate in groups of four: one year both home and away; one year at home only; and one year away only.  Over the course of the three-year cycle primary partners play a total of six times and all other conference opponents play four times.

The format allows each program to see opponents with more regularity and creates an increase in competitive balance throughout the teams.

The league also determined that all 14 league members will qualify for the ACC men's and women’s basketball tournaments. However, how the tournaments will be formatted will be announced at a later date.




Posted on: July 24, 2011 9:31 pm
 

Tar Heels not focusing on upcoming penalties

PINEHURST, N.C. – North Carolina is going to get hit by the NCAA – and probably hit hard – but two UNC seniors said Sunday they’re trying not to think about the upcoming penalties. 

“We really don’t think about that too much,” UNC senior center Jonathan Cooper said during the ACC's Football Kickoff. “It’s in the back of our minds, it’s on the back burner – what happens, happens. We’re just trying to work on improving.”

When the allegations came out, Cooper said he didn’t bother reading the NCAA’s 42-page report. 

“I just heard people say it was out,” Cooper said. “It was probably more information than what we already know. I don’t pay much attention to it honestly. Whatever happens, I don’t have any control.”

The NCAA’s report listed nine allegations against the Tar Heels’ program. Several players were suspended for part or all of last season because of the allegations. However, both Cooper and North Carolina senior defensive tackle Tydreke Powell don’t hold grudges against those teammates – even though the program could see significant penalties. 

“I think all of them are great guys,” Cooper said. “We all make mistakes. I’ve made mistakes in my life and I can’t say I’m any better than them. It hurts what could have been [if those players weren’t suspended], I still love the guys, they’re my teammates, they’re Tar Heels. I don’t hold anything against them.”

Powell had similar thoughts. 

“I don’t have anything against them,” Powell said. “Everyone makes mistakes. There’s no one that’s perfect in this world, I don’t hold any grudges at all.”

Powell said the Tar Heels can’t dwell on what might happen with the upcoming penalties or it will affect this year’s performance. 

“We’ve just got to throw it over our shoulders and strap up and play,” Powell said. “No matters what happens, we’ve still got to play.

“You can’t think about it [possible infractions]. If you think about it, it will wear you down. There’s nothing we can do about it. Why think about it? If you want to come out and have a great season you have to avoid thinking about it.”



Posted on: July 20, 2011 3:00 pm
 

Slive says you can win without cheating

HOOVER, Ala. – In the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has reported in depth on cheating in college athletics. And even since the series began three more schools – West Virginia, Georgia Tech and LSU – have received major NCAA sanctions.

So I posed the question Wednesday to SEC commissioner Mike Slive that our series sought out to answer: Can you win in college football these days without cheating?

The commissioner’s answer: “Yes.”

“There’s a tendency to overstate – if there’s a school on probation for phone calls or text messaging, you’re going to lump that in with another school who might had done something very different,” Slive said.

“We need to figure out what we really want to stop and go from there.”

In the past 25 years, SEC programs have committed the most NCAA major infractions of any conference. Since 1987, every SEC football program, except for Vanderbilt, has received a major infraction.

SEC football programs are hardly the only guilty parties. Since 1987, only 21 of the 67 automatic qualifying BCS conference schools have not committed a major infraction. That number likely will reduce to 20 after the NCAA rules on the various allegations concerning North Carolina.


Posted on: July 13, 2011 1:30 pm
 

Another one bites the NCAA infractions dust

And then there were 73.

For the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has been reporting on various elements involved with cheating in college football.

During the series, we had referenced that there had been 72 major violations at 56 schools since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

Well, it’s now up to 73 major infractions and 57 schools after West Virginia's July 8 violations, stemming from failure to monitor charges against former coaches Rich Rodriguez and Bill Stewart, are now included in the database of NCAA infractions.

West Virginia had been one of 23 automatic qualifying BCS conference teams that had not committed a major violation since 1987, so now that number is reduced to 22. That also means 45 of the 67 AQ BCS schools - 67.1 percent of the schools from the six power conferences.

The final and fifth installment of our series is Friday, so it’s doubtful the NCAA would rule on any major infractions before then. But, then again, you never know.

Here’s the updated list of the 22 AQ football programs without a major infraction since 1987:

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt.


 
 
 
 
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