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Tag:Maryland
Posted on: February 3, 2012 12:36 pm
Edited on: February 3, 2012 4:37 pm
 

ACC ready for Pitt, Syracuse. But when?

Pittsburgh and Syracuse may not be leaving the Big East for the ACC for another two years, but the Panthers and Orange know now which ACC divisions they’ll be in. Pittsburgh will compete in the ACC’s Coastal Division, while Syracuse will be in the ACC’s Atlantic Division, the ACC’s athletic directors voted Friday.

The ACC also voted to increase its league football schedule from eight to nine conference games when the Panthers and Orange come on board.

Pittsburgh and Syracuse aren’t scheduled to join the ACC until July 1, 2014. However, that timetable could get moved up depending on if West Virginia is allowed to leave the Big East early for the Big 12. West Virginia is trying to join the Big 12 this fall, while the Big East is trying to make the Mountaineers honor the league’s exit agreement and stay until June 30, 2014.

Pittsburgh and Syracuse have not indicated they would pursue legal action, like West Virginia has, to leave the Big East before 2014, but sources told CBSSports.com that both schools are monitoring West Virginia’s situation and would try to join the ACC early if the Mountaineers are able to leave before 2014.

ACC commissioner John Swofford wouldn’t speculate on Pittsburgh and Syracuse joining the ACC before 2014. “First of all, (that decision) is between Pitt and Syracuse and the Big East,” Swofford said.

However, if the Panthers and Orange can leave before 2014, the ACC will be ready.

“The fact we made our decision how we will schedule and compete certainly helps us (when they join),” Swofford said. “In terms of when that time may come, I don’t want to get into a hypothetical of this or that. Our position continues to be that we want to prepare ourselves when they’re ready and it’s appropriate for them to join us.”

If West Virginia leaves the Big East before 2014, it will likely have to pay a substantial financial penalty to the Big East. Swofford would not speculate whether the ACC would assist Pitt and Syracuse financially to assist them if they were able to leave the Big East early.

The ACC is expected to announce its 2012 football schedule in the next two weeks, so even if WVU and the Big East settles in the coming days it's unlikely Pitt and Syracuse would be able to join for the 2012-13 school year. Before the 2013 season is a more realisitic possibility.

Whenever they do get to the ACC, Pittsburgh will join Miami, Georgia Tech, Duke, North Carolina, Virginia and Virginia Tech in the Coastal Division. Syracuse will join Clemson, Florida State, N.C. State, Boston College, Maryland and Wake Forest in the Atlantic.

The current primary crossover partners will remain consistent with Syracuse and Pitt becoming primary crossover partners with each other.

When Pitt and Syracuse join the ACC, the league will play a nine-game conference football schedule. The format will consist of each team playing all six in its division each year, plus its primary crossover partner each year and two rotating opponents from the opposite division.

“We’ve been evaluating (eight or nine-game league schedules) since back in the fall,” Swofford said. “We want to see and play each other as much as reasonably possible.”

Swofford also said that adding conference television inventory (more ACC games) also was beneficial.

This six-year cycle allows each team to play each divisional opponent and its primary crossover partner six times (three home and three away) while also playing each rotating crossover opponent two times (one home and one away).

In basketball, the ACC will play an 18-game conference schedule beginning in the 2012-13 school year.

After Pitt and Syracuse join, each school will have one primary partner (Boston College and Syracuse; Clemson and Georgia Tech; Duke and North Carolina; Florida State and Miami; Maryland and Pitt; N.C. State and Wake Forest; Virginia and Virginia Tech).

The scheduling model will be based on a three-year cycle during which teams will play every league opponent at least once with the primary partners playing home and away annually while the other 12 rotate in groups of four: one year both home and away; one year at home only; and one year away only.  Over the course of the three-year cycle primary partners play a total of six times and all other conference opponents play four times.

The format allows each program to see opponents with more regularity and creates an increase in competitive balance throughout the teams.

The league also determined that all 14 league members will qualify for the ACC men's and women’s basketball tournaments. However, how the tournaments will be formatted will be announced at a later date.




Posted on: August 11, 2011 3:51 pm
Edited on: August 11, 2011 4:02 pm
 

17 football schools wouldn't have met APR minimum

With the NCAA’s Division 1 Board of Directors decision on Thursday to increase the average four-year APR score to 930 in order to be able to participate in the NCAA basketball tournament and bowl games, 17 of the Football Bowl Subdivision schools would not have met the APR requirement in the 2009-10 season.

Here are the football programs by conference that did not have a 930 APR in 2009-10:

ACC – Maryland, N.C. State
Big East – Louisville
Big Ten – Michigan
Pac-12 – Colorado, Washington State
Conference USA – UAB, Houston, Southern Miss, Tulsa, UTEP
Independent – Brigham Young
Mid-American – Akron
Sun Belt – Florida Atlantic, Louisiana-Monroe
WAC – Idaho, New Mexico State

Each school from the Big 12, SEC and Mountain West had at least a 930 APR.

Of the 17 schools with sub 930 APRs, eight played in bowl games last season – Maryland, N.C. State, Louisville, Michigan, Southern Miss, Tulsa, UTEP and BYU.

If the 930 APR requirement was in place, the Beef O' Brady's St. Petersburg Bowl (Louisville vs. Southern Miss) and New Mexico Bowl (BYU vs. UTEP) would have been seeking additional teams since their four schools would not have qualified.



Posted on: July 8, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Presenting NCAA's most frequent cheaters club

As our series on college football’s cheaters continues today, I looked at the most frequent cheaters – at least in terms of major infractions – since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

It’s a neck-and-neck race between Alabama and Texas Tech, with three major infractions each.

There are also a dozen teams – Cal, Colorado, Florida International, Florida State, Illinois, Minnesota, Mississippi State, Oklahoma, SMU, Texas A&M, USC and Washington – with two infractions each

Here are the remaining 42 teams with one major infraction each: Arkansas, Arkansas State, Arizona State, Auburn, Ball State, Baylor, Central Florida, Cincinnati, Clemson, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Houston, Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky, Louisiana Lafayette, Marshall, Maryland, Memphis, Miami, Michigan, Michigan State, Mississippi, New Mexico, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Oklahoma State, Oregon, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, San Diego State, South Carolina, Syracuse, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, UTEP, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Washington State and Wisconsin.

In all 56 of the 120 FBS programs have committed a major infraction in the past 25 years, including nearly two-thirds of the automatic qualifying BCS programs.

By the way, I loved a response on Twitter from @FGrimes1 – listed as Forrest Grimes – defending Texas Tech’s three major infractions. He wrote: “Most of Techs major infractions came around the same time, way to make Tech look like a contuinously dirty program a--hole."

For Mr. Grimes’ information, Tech’s violations were not at the same time – but spaced more than 10 years apart in 1987, 1998 and on Jan. 7, 2011 – during Grimes’ current semester as a journalism major at Tech

While our two-week series is looking at whether schools can win without cheating, I think it’s important to recognize the 23 AQ BCS programs that have not committed a major infraction since 1987 … so far.

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida, West Virginia.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt


Posted on: June 23, 2011 5:01 pm
Edited on: June 24, 2011 12:13 pm
 

Who survives among the not so Fab 5?

CBSSports.com’s Dennis Dodd unveiled his annual Hot Seat Ratings for all 120 FBS coaches today. Here’s a look at his complete ratings, with coaches rated from 0 (untouchable) to 5 (scorching).

We have good news for 115 coaches: you received lower than a 4-rating on Dodd’s hot scale and while that’s not a guarantee you’ll be coaching next fall, your odds are a lot better than the remaining five.

Those other five coaches – Washington State’s Paul Wulff, New Mexico’s Mike Locksley, UCLA’s Rick Neuheisel, Tulane’s Bob Toledo and Illinois’ Ron Zook – might want to turn up their AC units. They received between a 4 or 5 rating: 4-4.5 is “Warm seat – feeling the pressure” and 5 is “On the hot seat – it’s time to win now.”

Looking back at Dodd’s Hot Seat Ratings for the past three seasons, he has given 19 coaches between a 4 and 5 rating. Of those coaches, 13 of 19 – or 68.4 percent – were fired before the next season.

Dodd also has only handed out the dreaded 5 rating to five coaches and four of the five were fired that season – Louisville’s Steve Kragthorpe (2009), North Texas’ Todd Dodge (2010), Colorado’s Dan Hawkins (2010) and Michigan’s Rich Rodriguez (2010). 

Only Wulff, who received a 5 rating in 2010, survived. But now Dodd has stuck Wulff with another 5 this season.

Based on Dodd’s ratings the past three seasons, at least three, maybe four, coaches among Wulff, Locksley, Neuheisel, Toledo and Zook will not be back in 2012.

Which coach of the not so Fab 5 will survive and who did Dodd totally miss the boat on and not give a 4 or 5 rating that deserved one?

2011 Hot Seat Rating
5 Paul Wulff, Washington State
4.5 Mike Locksley, New Mexico
4 Rick Neuheisel, UCLA
4 Bob Toledo, Tulane
4 Ron Zook, Illinois

2010 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
5 Todd Dodge, North Texas
5 Dan Hawkins, Colorado
5 Rich Rodriguez, Michigan
4.5 Ralph Friedgen, Maryland
4 Tim Brewster, Minnesota
4 Bill Lynch, Indiana

Survived
5 Paul Wulff, Washington State
4.5 Mike Locksley, New Mexico
4.5 Ron Zook, Illinois

2009 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
5 Steve Kragthorpe, Louisville
4 Al Groh, Virginia
4 Mark Snyder, Marshall
4 Charlie Weis, Notre Dame

Survived
4 Todd Dodge, North Texas

2008 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
4.95 Ty Willingham, Washington
4.5 Greg Robinson, Syracuse
4 Brent Guy, Utah State

Survived
4 Mike Sanford, UNLV
4 Mike Stoops, Arizona


Posted on: June 21, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: June 22, 2011 8:51 am
 

Rutgers snares 5th highest per year stadium deal

High Point Solution Stadium. Not exactly the most tradition rich name in college sports, but, hey, it is the newest. Tuesday, Rutgers announced a 10-year naming rights deal with High Points Solution worth $6.5 million.

The initial reaction on my Twitter feed to a corporation naming a college stadium was "Ugh." But if you haven't figured out by now how vital big bucks are in college football these days, then it's time for you to take off your leather helmet and put it in storage.

Remember a time when bowl games were actually named after fruits and not dot.com businesses or car muffler stores? Yeah, me neither. Now it's a rarity if a bowl game isn't named after a corporation. Years from now, the same - unfortunately - will be said about college football stadiums.

Anyway, Rutgers' deal is the fifth-highest per year amount for a college stadium named after a corporation/business. This list does not include stadiums named after individuals who may have contributed several gazillion dollars (i.e. Oklahoma State's Boone Pickens Stadium). This list also does not include college teams that play in NFL stadiums, such as Pittsburgh's Heinz Field or South Florida's Raymond James Stadium.

Here are the 11 college stadiums named after corporations and I'm sure this list will double within the next five years. For what it's worth the breakdown of corporation named college stadiums by conference: Big East (3), ACC (2), Sun Belt (2), Big Ten (1), Big 12 (1), C-USA (1) and MAC (1). (1).

School (Year) Stadium Name; Terms

Minnesota (2005) TCF Bank Stadium; 25 years, $35 million
Per year average: $1.4 million

UCF (2006) Bright House Networks Stadium; 15 yrs, $15 million
Per year average: $1 million

Maryland (2006) Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Texas Tech (2006) Jones AT&T Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Rutgers (2011) High Point Solutions Stadium; 10 years, $6.5 million
Per year average: $650,000

Louisville (1998) Papa John's Cardinal Stadium; 10 years, $5 million
Per year average: $500,000

Louisville (2004) Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium; 33 years, $15 million
Per year average: $454,000

Akron (2009) InfoCision Stadium; 20 years, $10 million
Per year average: $500,000

Troy (2003) Movie Gallery Veterans Stadium; 20 yrs, $5 million
Per year average: $250,000

Syracuse (1980) Carrier Dome; Indefinite, $2.75 million
Per year average: n/a

Wake Forest (2007) BB&T Field; 10 years, undisclosed
Per year average: n/a

Western Kentucky (2007) Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium; unknown, $5 million
Per year average: n/a



 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com