Tag:MAC
Posted on: March 7, 2012 4:24 pm
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MAC reorganizes after Temple departure

Since 2007, the Mid-American Conference had somehow avoided the musical chairs that is better known as conference realignment.

That all changed on Wednesday when Temple officially announced it was leaving the MAC to join the Big East Conference.

The Owls had been football members of the MAC since 2007, but will join the Big East as an all sports member. Temple’s football team joins this fall, while its Olympic sports won’t join the Big East until the 2013-14 school year.

“I don’t think it was any secret they wanted to be in the Big East,” MAC commissioner Jon Steinbrecher told CBSSports.com . “But it took a lot of interesting circumstances in the last 12-16 months to set in motion what happened.”

What happened – at least this is the cliff notes version – is the Big East lost West Virginia and TCU to the Big 12 for this fall and Pittsburgh and Syracuse to the ACC in either 2013 or 2014. The Big East was left with only seven football members and had to add Temple to have an eight-team conference this fall.

Temple and the MAC reached a $6 million settlement – more than double the $2.5 million required for a team providing at least two year’s notice. Temple also will pay the Atlantic 10 $1 million for removing its Olympic sports before the 2013-14 season.

With the loss of Temple the MAC moved Bowling Green from the MAC West to the MAC East. The MAC will have 13 football members this fall.

The seven-team East will consist of Akron, Bowling Green, Buffalo, Kent State, UMass (which makes the move up from the FCS ranks), Miami (Ohio) and Ohio. The six-team West will consist of Ball State, Central Michigan, Eastern Michigan, Northern Illinois, Toledo and Western Michigan.

Despite the loss of Temple, Steinbrecher said the MAC is not looking to immediately add another team.

“We’ll take a deep breath and watch and see whatever occurs and evolves [on the conference landscape] and make our decisions based on what’s best for the Mid-American Conference,” Steinbrecher said. “Our core membership is very solid.”

MAC teams will play eight game conference schedules this fall. The schedule is expected to be released in the coming weeks, Steinbrecher said.


Posted on: March 2, 2012 2:58 pm
 

Temple to Big East after it settles with MAC

Temple has given the Big East a verbal agreement it will join the league in 2012, but an official announcement can not be made until the Owls finalize their settlement to leave the Mid-American Conference, sources told CBSSports.com.

The Big East wants to make the announcement that Temple is joining by Monday so it won’t conflict with the Big East men’s basketball tournament, which starts Tuesday in New York. Whether it will happen that quickly depends on the Owls’ negotiations with the MAC.

The MAC’s exit fee is $2.5 million for schools that provide two years notice. However, there is no specific penalty for a school leaving with less than two years notice, a source told CBSSports.com. 

Temple was a Big East football-only member from 1991-2004 and the plan was for Temple to join the Big East in all sports in 2012. The Owls' football program competes in the MAC and their Olympic sports are in the Atlantic 10 Conference. To leave the Atlantic 10 with less than a year’s notice costs $2 million, a source said, while it’s $1 million if more than a year’s notice is given.

Because of the difference in exit fees Temple would pay the A-10, there remains a possibility Temple could join the Big East in football this fall, but its Olympic sports wouldn’t join the Big East until 2013. 

MAC commissioner Jon Steinbrecher and Big East commissioner John Marinatto declined comment.

The reason the Big East needs Temple in its football league this fall is to replace West Virginia, which left for the Big 12, on the conference schedule. Without West Virginia, the Big East would have only seven league members and six conference games. With Temple, it will have eight schools and seven league games. 

On Friday, Syracuse released its complete five-game non-conference schedule. The Big East has told league schools that they will play seven conference games, meaning an additional member would be added for this fall.

“The Big East has to assist us with that (seventh) conference game, whatever that is,” Syracuse said deputy athletic director Herman Frazier told the Syracuse Post-Standard. 

Frazier told the Post-Standard he expects the Big East to make an announcement in the next seven to 10 days.

However, it will happen much quicker if the Owls can hammer out a settlement with the MAC.

Temple’s Board of Trustees met on Wednesday to discuss the Owls’ “contracts,”  the Temple News reported.


Posted on: March 1, 2012 2:13 pm
 

SEC loves (playing) the Sun Belt

While Thursday’s release of the Sun Belt’s 2012 football schedule didn’t bring as much fanfare as the SEC or Big 12 schedule release, it did give us a chance to look at which other conferences love the Sun Belt. Specifically which of the other 10 FBS conferences love playing against the Sun Belt.

And no one loves playing/beating the Sun Belt more than the SEC, especially Mississippi State.

Three of the Bulldogs' four non-conference games are against Sun Belt members Troy, South Alabama and Middle Tennessee. Their fourth non-conference game is against FCS member Jackson State. I guess there were no Division III teams available that week.

Anyway, Mississippi State is among nine SEC schools that will play Sun Belt schools this fall in a total of 12 non-conference games. The only SEC schools without a Sun Belt team on the schedule is Missouri, Ole Miss, South Carolina, Texas A&M and Vanderbilt. Defending national champion Alabama’s schedule features two Sun Belt opponents: Western Kentucky and Florida Atlantic.

After the SEC, Conference USA has the most schools (six) playing Sun Belt opponents with a total of eight games.

Mississippi State is one of five schools with multiple Sun Belt opponents. Alabama, Memphis, Tulane and Navy each have two Sun Belt non-conference games.

The only FBS league that isn’t playing the Sun Belt is the WAC.

Last year, the Sun Belt was only 10-25 in non-conference games against FBS opponents, including a 1-2 bowl record.

Conference (games vs. Sun Belt)

ACC (3):
Duke, Georgia Tech, N.C. State
Big East (1):
Louisville
Big 10 (1):
Nebraska
Big 12 (3):
Baylor, Kansas State, Oklahoma State
C-USA (6):
Houston, Memphis 2, Southern Miss, Tulane 2, UAB, UCF
Independents (1):
Navy 2
MAC (1):
Akron
Mountain West (1):
Hawaii
SEC (9):
Alabama 2, Arkansas, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi State 3, Tennessee
Pac-12 (1):
Oregon
WAC (0)

Posted on: February 23, 2012 11:14 am
 

A-10: Temple's interest in Big East not a shock

With Temple likely headed to the Big East as an all-sports member in 2012, Atlantic 10 commissioner Bernadette McGlade didn't sound surprised the Owls would seek such a move.

"Temple is a valued member of the A-10,” McGlade said in a statement. “However we are well aware that finding the right home for its FBS football program will drive its future membership decision for all sports. The Atlantic 10 is a large, strong league and I will continue to work with our membership in the best interest of the conference."

Temple is a member of the Mid-American Conference in football and a member of the Atlantic 10 in its Olympic sports. To leave the A-10 with less than a year's notice, it would cost $2 million. To leave the MAC with less than a years notice will cost the Owls at least $2.5 million.

By moving to the Big East in 2012, the league would have eight football members and 16 basketball members.

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: June 21, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: June 22, 2011 8:51 am
 

Rutgers snares 5th highest per year stadium deal

High Point Solution Stadium. Not exactly the most tradition rich name in college sports, but, hey, it is the newest. Tuesday, Rutgers announced a 10-year naming rights deal with High Points Solution worth $6.5 million.

The initial reaction on my Twitter feed to a corporation naming a college stadium was "Ugh." But if you haven't figured out by now how vital big bucks are in college football these days, then it's time for you to take off your leather helmet and put it in storage.

Remember a time when bowl games were actually named after fruits and not dot.com businesses or car muffler stores? Yeah, me neither. Now it's a rarity if a bowl game isn't named after a corporation. Years from now, the same - unfortunately - will be said about college football stadiums.

Anyway, Rutgers' deal is the fifth-highest per year amount for a college stadium named after a corporation/business. This list does not include stadiums named after individuals who may have contributed several gazillion dollars (i.e. Oklahoma State's Boone Pickens Stadium). This list also does not include college teams that play in NFL stadiums, such as Pittsburgh's Heinz Field or South Florida's Raymond James Stadium.

Here are the 11 college stadiums named after corporations and I'm sure this list will double within the next five years. For what it's worth the breakdown of corporation named college stadiums by conference: Big East (3), ACC (2), Sun Belt (2), Big Ten (1), Big 12 (1), C-USA (1) and MAC (1). (1).

School (Year) Stadium Name; Terms

Minnesota (2005) TCF Bank Stadium; 25 years, $35 million
Per year average: $1.4 million

UCF (2006) Bright House Networks Stadium; 15 yrs, $15 million
Per year average: $1 million

Maryland (2006) Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Texas Tech (2006) Jones AT&T Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Rutgers (2011) High Point Solutions Stadium; 10 years, $6.5 million
Per year average: $650,000

Louisville (1998) Papa John's Cardinal Stadium; 10 years, $5 million
Per year average: $500,000

Louisville (2004) Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium; 33 years, $15 million
Per year average: $454,000

Akron (2009) InfoCision Stadium; 20 years, $10 million
Per year average: $500,000

Troy (2003) Movie Gallery Veterans Stadium; 20 yrs, $5 million
Per year average: $250,000

Syracuse (1980) Carrier Dome; Indefinite, $2.75 million
Per year average: n/a

Wake Forest (2007) BB&T Field; 10 years, undisclosed
Per year average: n/a

Western Kentucky (2007) Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium; unknown, $5 million
Per year average: n/a



Posted on: June 15, 2011 1:56 pm
 

Conference breakdown of coaches APR

Didn't get enough from my story on the top coaches ranked by their Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores, here's a comprehensive look at each coach ranked by conference.

CBSSports.com compiled the APR averages of 109 of the 120 coaches in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) using data provided by the NCAA. CBSSports.com's study is based on the NCAA's available data between 2003-04 and 2009-10 so 11 coaches debuting this season were not included. 

Below is a list of each coach by conference preceded by the coaches national rank:

Atlantic Coast

1. Dabo Swinney, Clemson 988
4. x-Paul Johnson, Georgia Tech 980
7. Frank Spaziani, Boston College 978
8. x-David Cutcliffe, Duke 976
13. Jim Grobe, Wake Forest 969
29. Jimbo Fisher, Florida State 959
30. x-Mike London, Virginia 958
33. Butch Davis, North Carolina 956
41. x-Randy Edsall, Maryland 951
(tie). x-Tom O'Brien, N.C. State 951
59. Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech 943
83. x-Al Golden, Miami 931

Big East

4. Greg Schiano, Rutgers 980
21. x-Paul Pasqualoni, UConn 964
26. y-Bill Stewart, West Virginia 960
50. Doug Marrone, Syracuse 948
54. x-Todd Graham, Pittsburgh 945
62. x-Skip Holtz, South Florida 941
74. x-Butch Jones, Cincinnati 936
109. Charlie Strong, Louisville 869

Big Ten

2. Pat Fitzgerald, Northwestern 986
13. Bret Bielema, Wisconsin 969
17. Joe Paterno, Penn State 967
18. x-Danny Hope, Purdue 966
19. x-Jerry Kill, Minnesota 965
21. Bill Lynch, Indiana 964
26. z-Jim Tressel, Ohio State 960
31. Bo Pelini, Nebraska 957
41. Kirk Ferentz, Iowa 951
51. x-Ron Zook, Illinois 946
59. x-Brady Hoke, Michigan 943
68. x-Mark Dantonio, Michigan State 939

Big 12

39. Gary Pinkel, Missouri 953
45. Bob Stoops, Oklahoma 950
48. x-Tommy Tuberville, Texas Tech 949
57. x-Art Briles, Baylor 944
62. Mack Brown, Texas 941
74. Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State 936
80. Mike Sherman, Texas A&M 933
94. x-Turner Gill, Kansas 926
95. Bill Snyder, Kansas State 925
102. Paul Rhoads, Iowa State 919

Southeastern

11. Mark Richt, Georgia 972
19. Dan Mullen, Mississippi State 965
34. x-Nick Saban, Alabama 955
41. x-Les Miles, LSU 951
57. Kentucky's Joker Phillips 944
66. x-Bobby Petrino, Arkansas 940
68. x-Derek Dooley, Tennessee 939
71. Steve Spurrier, South Carolina 937
78. x-Gene Chizik, Auburn 934
(tie). x-Houston Nutt, Ole Miss 934
James Franklin, Vanderbilt n/a
Will Muschamp, Florida n/a

Pac-12

31. Kyle Whittingham, Utah 957
34. Jeff Tedford, California 955
45. Rick Neuheisel, UCLA 950
62. Chip Kelly, Oregon 941
66. Mike Riley, Oregon State 940
71. x-Paul Wulff, Washington State 937
82. Steve Sarkisian, Washington 932
92. x-Lane Kiffin, USC 927
95. x-Dennis Erickson, Arizona State 925
98. Mike Stoops, Arizona 924
Jon Embree, Colorado n/a
David Shaw, Stanford n/a

Independents

3. Ken Niumatalolo, Navy 981
23. x-Rich Ellerson, Army 963
80. x-Brian Kelly, Notre Dame 933
89. Bronco Mendenhall, BYU 928

Mountain West

6. Troy Calhoun, Air Force 979
9. Chris Petersen, Boise State 975
16. Gary Patterson, TCU 968
26. Mike Locksley, New Mexico 960
37. Steve Fairchild, Colorado State 954
71. x-Bobby Hauck, UNLV 937
83. Dave Christensen, Wyoming 931
89. x-Rocky Long, San Diego State 928

Western Athletic

34. Greg McMackin, Hawaii 955
48. Pat Hill, Fresno State 949
54. x-Gary Andersen, Utah State 945
(tie). Sonny Dykes, Louisiana Tech 945
70. Chris Ault, Nevada 938
86. Mike MacIntyre, San Jose State 930
92. DeWayne Walker, New Mexico State 927
95. Robb Akey, Idaho 925

Conference USA

12. Bob Toledo, Tulane 970
39. George O'Leary, UCF 953
45. x-David Bailiff, Rice 950
59. Ruffin McNeill, East Carolina 943
77. Doc Holliday, Marshall 935
88. Larry Fedora, Southern Miss 929
89. x-June Jones, SMU 928
99. Kevin Sumlin, Houston 923
100. Mike Price, UTEP 920
106. Neil Callaway, UAB 904
107. Larry Porter, Memphis 903
Bill Blakenship, Tulsa n/a

Mid-American

14. x-Dave Clawson, Bowling Green 969
24. Tim Beckman, Toledo 961
(tie). x-Pete Lembo, Ball State 961
51. Dan Enos, Central Michigan 946
(tie). Frank Solich, Ohio 946
62. Bill Cubit, Western Michigan 941
103. Ron English, Eastern Michigan 918
(tie). Jeff Quinn, Buffalo 918
108. Rob Ianello, Akron 900
Steve Addazio, Temple n/a
Dave Doeren, Northern Illinois n/a
Darrell Hazzell, Kent State n/a
Don Treadwell, Miami, Ohio n/a

Sun Belt

10. Rick Stockstill, Middle Tennessee 973
37. Willie Taggart, Western Kentucky 954
74. Mario Cristobal, Florida International 936
83. x-Dan McCarney, North Texas 931
86. Larry Blakeney, Troy 930
100. x-Todd Berry, Louisiana-Monroe 920
103. Howard Schnellenberger, Florida Atlantic 918
Hugh Freeze, Arkansas State n/a
Mark Hudspeth, Louisiana-Lafayette n/a

APR rankings by conference

1. ACC 961.7
2. Big Ten 959.4
3. Mountain West 954.0
4. SEC 947.1
5. Big East 942.9
6. MAC 940.0
7. WAC 939.3
8. Pac 12 938.8
9. Big 12 937.6
10. Sun Belt 937.4
11. C-USA 932.5

x-NCAA's APR data was from coach's current and/or previous schools between 2003-10
y-Stewart resigned from West Virginia on Friday
z-Tressel resigned from Ohio State on May 30
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com