Tag:Les Miles
Posted on: January 6, 2012 3:56 pm
 

The Mad Hatter Les Miles is not a fan of visors

NEW ORLEANS – Before Les Miles become the Mad Hatter at LSU, he was head coach at Oklahoma State.

Miles also wore a hat at Oklahoma State, but he would not let his staff at OSU wear visors because that was what Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops wore.

In 2001, Miles left a three-year stint as a Dallas Cowboys assistant to become head coach at Oklahoma State. Stoops was in his third season coaching at rival Oklahoma and Miles wanted to change the culture and attitude of Oklahoma State.

It all started with the hat.

“I can only tell you visors were not allowed while I was coaching at Oklahoma State, only because, frankly, it was an identity the opponents had,” Miles told CBSSports.com Friday. “The reality of it is a lot of the young guys had real thick hair, all wanted visors. I said, 'No we're wearing hats or we're wearing nothing.'

"A lot of them opted into the nothing. We wanted to be discernibly different, that's all.” 

Mike Gundy was Oklahoma State’s offensive coordinator under Miles from 2001-04 until Miles went to LSU.

Gundy said he had heard that Miles wouldn’t let his staff wear visors during his time at Oklahoma State because Stoops wore one at Oklahoma.

“I never asked him directly if that was the reason,” Gundy told CBSSports.com. “I do know this: another assistant and I wanted to wear a visor (at Oklahoma State) and he (Miles) said ‘we don’t wear visors.’

“He’s got those 10-gallon hats. I didn’t wear one. They were wider than my head. I went to the equipment room and they said we don’t have visors. I never asked why we couldn’t have visors. We just couldn’t have visors.”

Since Gundy replaced Miles as head coach at Oklahoma State in 2005, Gundy has worn visors. As for Miles, he’s still the Mad Hatter.

LSU sophomore free safety Eric Reid was asked if he’s ever seen Miles wear a visor.

“I don’t think so,” Reid said laughing.


Posted on: October 20, 2011 4:19 pm
Edited on: October 20, 2011 4:57 pm
 

Policy indicates LSU trio could miss Alabama game

LSU could be without cornerbacks Tyrann Mathieu and Tharold Simon and running back Spencer Ware against Alabama if -- and the key word is "if" -- their suspensions were for a second failed drug test, according to the school’s substance abuse policy.

Mathieu, Simon and Ware will not play Saturday against Auburn "after testing positive for synthetic marijuana," The Times-Picayune reported.

LSU officials and coach Les Miles have not confirmed that the players have been suspended for a failed drug test.

Based on the school's substance abuse policy, obtained by CBSSports.com, a second positive test results in a "suspension from up to 15 percent [rounding method used] of countable contests and/or suspension up to 30 days or combination thereof upon recommendation of treatment team. The penalty will be observed in all sports from the date of signed notification."

The policy does not specify if "up to 15 percent" is a subjective decision, meaning a student-athlete can be suspended "up to 15 percent" or if the suspension is "automatically" 15 percent of games. For a 12-game season, a 15-percent suspension computes to 1.8 games, which would be rounded up to a two-game suspension.

LSU's policy also states there is no automatic suspension for a first positive test and a one-year suspension for a third.

Mathieu and Ware are starters for the No. 1-ranked Tigers, while Simon is a backup cornerback who plays mostly in nickel situations.

After playing Auburn Saturday, LSU is off next week before visiting No. 2-ranked Alabama.

According to the school’s substance abuse policy, every student-athlete is tested a minimum of twice a year. The tests can be random or announced.

However, once a student-athlete has a positive test, the "athlete is subject to unannounced testing at an increased frequency at the discretion of the Drug Prevention Coordinator," LSU’s policy states.

LSU's student-athletes are tested for: "marijuana; synthetic marijuana; cocaine; amphetamine class (includes speed, designer drug 'ecstasy,' etc.); LSD (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide); opiate class (includes heroine, morphine, codeine, etc.); ephedrine; alcohol (ethanol); anabolic steroids and miscellaneous random tests for Clenbuterol, probenecid, barbiturates and adulterants." 

Ware is LSU's leading rusher, while Mathieu is a dark horse Heisman Trophy candidate.

"I certainly understand the interest surrounding what seems to be news," Miles told reporters after Wednesday’s practice. "The problem with that news is that it's internal discipline and an internal function of a team. I'm not inclined to be forthcoming with information. I'm not reactionary to meet the [needs] of the media and things external to this building.

"So, with that being said, there’s a process that I go through. When there's information that I can share, I will. I can only tell you that I’m doing this in the best interest of our football team, our squad and to maintain a deportment and a procedure that I'm true to in a process that I'm very comfortable with. There's no real information about any specific player that I'll address at this point."

Posted on: July 22, 2011 12:53 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 3:28 pm
 

Miles discusses LSU's use of recruiting services

HOOVER, Ala. – LSU coach Les Miles, whose school is under NCAA investigation for its dealings with Willie Lyles, said he uses recruiting services primarily for the video services they provide.

“We use XOS, it does just a tremendous body of work,” Miles said Friday. “We certainly want to cover the country. We have to have film video of prospects really across the country. We feel like there are certain areas we need to cover in other years more and certainly we want to recruit from Houston through to Florida. We’re going to hit those things hard absolutely.

“Certain years we’re going to be interested in junior colleges, but the point being you get it done, you get [the video] just as efficiently as you can and you study it. That’s how we’re going to recruit.

“There’s really nothing else a service can provide us other than video.”

Miles said he was prohibited from talking about Lyles and said the school was fully cooperating with the NCAA.

LSU paid $6,000 for Lyles’ junior college package. Oregon paid $25,000 and Cal $5,00 for Lyles’ recruiting services, which have been exposed as incomplete and fraudulent.

Miles, in his initial interview session at SEC Media Days, was asked about SEC commissioner Mike Slive’s proposed changes, including multi-year scholarships and increasing the GPA for incoming freshman from 2.0 to 2.5.

“There always will be change,” Miles said. “There’s a positive piece there. I think cost of attendance is a wonderful piece. I think [Slive] brings to light a multi-year scholarship that could be [extended to] six years. In my opinion anything that extends the timeline to allow our guys to graduate is a very good thing.”

Miles wasn’t as agreeable with the increased GPA. He believes colleges shouldn’t be “elitist” and said college was a place individuals “learn to develop.”

“I might see the 2.5 [GPA] in a freshman year before he plays as a real issue,” Miles said. “I got a degree in economics from a very prestigious institution [Michigan]. I can’t tell you when I achieved a 2.5, I hope I have. So that may have prohibited me from taking snaps – other than my lack of talent.”

Also, an LSU spokesman said that WR Russell Shepard has not been suspended. Shepard was scheduled to attend media days, but was replaced. Miles said Shepard had some personal issues he had to resolve in Baton Rouge, La., but would not elaborate.
Posted on: June 1, 2011 4:57 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Spurrier wants players to receive $300 a game

DESTIN, Fla. – South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier said he was battling laryngitis so he had to speak softly. His message, though, was loud and clear: football players should receive financial compensation.

At Wednesday’s SEC spring meetings, Spurrier presented a proposal that league coaches – out of their own pockets – provide $300 a game to its players. The money would be for game expenses.

“They can give to their parents for travel, lodging, meals,” Spurrier said. “Maybe they could take their girlfriends out Saturday night and so forth.”

Spurrier said six other coaches signed his proposal: Alabama’s Nick Saban, Florida’s Will Muschamp, Ole Miss’ Houston Nutt, Mississippi State’s Dan Mullen, LSU’s Les Miles and Tennessee’s Derek Dooley.

“A bunch of us coaches felt so strongly about it we would be willing to pay 70 guys 300 bucks a game,” Spurrier said. “That’s only $21,000 a game. I doubt it will get passed, but as the coaches in the SEC we make all the money as do the universities with television [deals]. And we need to give more to our players. That was something we need to get out there.”

The five coaches who didn’t sign Spurrier’s proposal: Arkansas’ Bobby Petrino, Auburn’s Gene Chizik, Georgia’s Mark Richt, Kentucky’s Joker Phillips and Vanderbilt’s James Franklin.

"I told the other coaches Im going to tell the media what coaches wouldn't sign," Spurrier said.

SEC commissioner Mike Slive said it was doubtful Spurrier’s proposal could ever get passed.

"I don't think [it would pass],” Slive said. “It was a gesture by Steve, thinking about student athlete welfare.”

Spurrier said he’s felt this way for years, especially how much money is made in college athletics by the universities and coaches.

“I just wish there was a way to give our players a little bit piece of the pie,” Spurrier said. “It’s so huge right now. As you know 50 years ago there was not any kind of money and the players got full scholarships. Now they’re still getting full scholarships and the money in the millions.

“I don’t know how to get it done. Hopefully there’s a way to get our guys that play football, a little piece of the pie. The coaches make so much, we ‘d be willing to pay it so there’s no additional expense to the university or anybody.”

 
 
 
 
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