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Tag:Iowa
Posted on: January 18, 2012 4:32 pm
Edited on: January 18, 2012 4:39 pm
 

Texas A&M, Notre Dame most overrated in 2011

Now that the 2011 college football season is finally completed – Bobby Hebert’s done ranting about Les Miles, right? – let’s take a look at how smart or, make that clueless,  the voters in the Associated Press poll were before the season.

I was one of the 60 voters that participated in the AP poll. Each summer we’re asked to produce a Top 25 out of thin air. And then come January, we discover we’re usually as accurate as a non-fiction piece from James Frey.

Surprisingly, though, this year we did a fairly decent job of predicting the future or, if you prefer, the teams did a decent job of living up to their preseason rankings.

First the good.

We nailed it! Of the AP’s preseason Top 25 teams, three schools – No. 7 Stanford, No. 14 TCU and No. 19 Georgia – finished with the same ranking in the final AP poll.

Missed it by this much: Of the remaining 22 teams ranked in the preseason, we were off by only three spots or less on six schools: Alabama (preseason No. 2, finished No. 1), Oregon (preseason No. 3, finished No. 4), LSU (preseason No. 4, finished No. 2), Boise State (preseason No. 5, finished No. 8), Wisconsin (preseason No. 10, finished No. 11) and South Carolina (preseason No. 12, finished No. 9).

At this point I’d like to mention of the preseason top 19 teams, nearly half (nine) finished within three spots in the final AP rankings. Not bad. Which brings me too …

Wow, were we wrong: Of the remaining 16 teams ranked in the preseason Top 25, nine schools finished in the final Top 25, but were nowhere close to their preseason rankings. No. 1 Oklahoma finished 16th, No. 6 Florida State finished 23rd, No. 9 Oklahoma State finished third, No. 10 Nebraska finished No. 24, No. 13 Virginia Tech finished No. 21, No. 15 Arkansas finished fifth, No. 17 Michigan State finished 11th, No. 24 West Virginia finished No. 17 and No. 25 USC finished No. 6.

That leaves seven schools that were ranked in the preseason Top 25 but plummeted out of the rankings by season’s end because (take your pick) they choked under the pressure of a preseason Top 25 ranking, didn’t deserve to be ranked, were overrated, underachieved or all of the above.

We/they totally blew it: Here they are: the not-so-Magnificent Seven teams that were ranked in the preseason Top 25 but ended the season outside the Top 25. No. 8 Texas A&M, No. 16 Notre Dame, No. 18 Ohio State, No. 20 Mississippi State, No. 21 Missouri, No. 22 Florida and No. 23 Auburn all finished out of the Top 25.

We never saw them coming: There were 48 schools that received at least one vote in the preseason Top 25 poll. Yet, there were four schools that did not receive a single preseason vote that still finished in the final top 25: Baylor (finishing No. 13), Kansas State (finishing No. 15), Clemson (finishing No. 22) and Cincinnati (finishing No. 25).

Three other schools received Top 25 preseason votes and were not in the preseason Top 25 but finished in the AP final poll: No. 12 Michigan, No. 18 Houston and No. 20 Southern Miss.

So who were the biggest surprises and disappointments of 2011? Look no further than the Big 12, which had the nation's two most pleasant surprises in Baylor and Kansas State and the nation's biggest disappointment in Texas A&M.

Based on their AP preseason rankings, the biggest surprises in 2011: Baylor, Kansas State, Clemson (yes, even with the Orange Bowl seal-clubbing), Michigan, Cincinnati, USC and Houston. The biggest disappointments: Texas A&M, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Mississippi State, Florida, Arizona State, Miami, Utah, Iowa, Florida State, N.C. State and Oklahoma.

Listed below are the 48 schools that received a vote in the preseason Top 25 and the difference of how many spots better (+) or worse (-) it finished in the final Top 25 rankings. Following the school is each team’s preseason and final ranking. If a school started unranked and finished unranked, it was considered starting/finishing at No. 49.

Diff School (Pre-Final ranking)
+36 Baylor (NR-13)
+34 Kansas State (NR-15)
+27 Clemson (NR-22)
+26 Michigan (38-12)
+24 Cincinnati (NR-25)
+19 USC (25-6)
+18 Houston (36-18)
+15 Virginia (NR-34)
+11 Southern Miss (31-20)
+13 Northern Illinois (41-28)
+10 Arkansas (15-5)
+7 West Virginia (24-17)
+7 Brigham Young (33-26)
+6 Oklahoma State (9-3)
+6 Michigan State (17-11)
+3 South Carolina (12-9)
+2 LSU (4-2)
+1 Alabama (2-1)
+1 Wisconsin (11-10)
0 Stanford (7-7)
0 TCU (14-14)
0 Georgia (19-19)
-1 Oregon (3-4)
-3 Boise State (5-8)
-3 Nevada (46-NR)
-3 Northwestern (46-NR)
-3 Washington (46-NR)
-4 Auburn (23-27)
-4 Texas (26-30)
-5 Arizona (44-NR)
-5 Maryland (44-NR)
-6 Penn State (27-33)
-6 Tulsa (43-NR)
-8 Virginia Tech (13-21)
-8 Missouri (21-29)
-8 Hawaii (41-NR)
-9 UCF (40-NR) 5
-10 Tennessee (39-NR)
-12 Pittsburgh (37-NR)
-14 Nebraska (10-24)
-14 Air Force (35-NR)
-15 Oklahoma (1-16)
-16 N.C. State (33-NR)
-17 Florida State (6-23)
-17 Iowa (32-NR)
-19 Utah (30-NR) 25
-20 Miami (29-NR)
-21 Arizona State (28-NR)
-27 Florida (22-NR)
-29 Mississippi State (20-NR)
-31 Ohio State (18-NR)
-33 Notre Dame (16-NR)
-41 Texas A&M (8-NR)



Posted on: December 31, 2011 1:26 am
Edited on: December 31, 2011 1:31 am
 

Oklahoma outlasts Iowa

TEMPE, Ariz. – On Thursday, Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops talked about the Sooners’ tradition. He mentioned the Sooners’ seven national titles.

Oklahoma has won “more than most people do,” Stoops said.

This year, the Sooners were the overwhelming favorites to win an eighth national championship. They were ranked No. 1 in both of the preseason Associated Press and USA Today coaches polls.

With 14 starters returning from last year’s 12-2 Fiesta Bowl and Big 12 championship team, the Sooners expected this season to be a historic one.

Unfortunately, it was.

Friday night’s victory against unranked Iowa at the Insight Bowl capped off one of the most disappointing seasons in Oklahoma’s storied history and also put the Sooners’ in some not-so-illustrious company.

Ranked No. 19 entering the game, Oklahoma will become only the third preseason No. 1 ranked team in the last 27 years that finished the season ranked outside the top 10 in the final AP poll. The others, according to collegepollarchive.com were Georgia, which finished No. 13 in 2008, and Penn State, finishing No. 16 in 1997.

The Sooners’ slide can be attributed to several factors: season-ending injuries to leading receiver Ryan Broyles and rusher Dom Whaley, transfers and a couple of head-scratching losses. The 41-38 defeat to Texas Tech as a four-touchdown favorite was the worst upset loss in Stoops’ career and OU’s 44-10 beat down by Oklahoma State was the most points the Sooners allowed to the Cowboys since 1945.


Category: NCAAF
Posted on: July 28, 2011 5:50 pm
 

Big Ten supports eliminating freshmen eligibility

CHICAGO – In the past week, SEC commissioner Mike Slive and ACC commissioner John Swofford laid out some drastic proposals concerning the future of college football. On Thursday, a couple of Big Ten coaches and Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany threw their support beyond an old idea that might become new again: freshman ineligibility.

“One thing I’m for is taking away freshmen eligibility,” Nebraska's Bo Pelini said at the Big Ten’s Football Kickoff. “ I think that could be the best thing that could happen to college football and probably college basketball and athletics in general.

“It would be a tremendous move. I don’t know if there’s a lot of momentum for that. I think making freshmen ineligible would help in a multitude of different ways.”

Up until the early 1970s, freshmen were not eligible to play. Delany brought up the idea to his coaches during the Big Ten’s spring meetings.

“Taking that first year and letting them get acclimated on campus, taking pressures away of having to produce as heralded recruited players,” Iowa's Kirk Ferentz said. “I think those would be healthy for football.

“I don't know if [that’s] practical. I don't know if we can work those out. That might be a great thing that would slow the recruiting industry down too. At the end of the day it would be great for the prospects and student-athletes.”

Pelini also believes it would improve the recruiting process.

“Let’s slow this thing down a bit,” Pelini said. “Ultimately that would be one of the changes, would not only help football wise and academically, but I think it would help the recruiting process and help the sport in a number of ways.

“There’s a pretty big division what people think on that subject, but I like that idea.”

Pelini also said he’s for proposals that would increase the minimum GPA for incoming freshmen from 2.0 to 2.5 but cautions “you have to be careful you don’t limit opportunities for kids.”

Ferentz also supports increasing the GPA for incoming recruits, while LSU’s Les Miles and South Carolina’s Steve Spurrier said last week they were against higher GPAs for recruits.

“The important thing is for young people to understand at a young age when they're in high school doing well, doing well early, instead of trying to catch up the last couple years,” Ferentz said. “It's going to take a cooperative effort from a lot of different folks.”

Posted on: July 14, 2011 2:23 pm
Edited on: July 14, 2011 6:18 pm
 

Georgia Tech vacates 2009 ACC title

Georgia Tech has vacated its 2009 ACC Championship and was put on four years probation by the NCAA's Committee on Infractions.

CBSSports.com first reported the Yellow Jackets would vacate the 2009 ACC title.

Georgia Tech’s penalties include using ineligible student athletes during the 2009 season. Two of those student athletes involved are former wide receiver Demaryius Thomas and defensive back Morgan Burnett, a source said. Thomas was a first round pick in the 2010 NFL draft and Burnett was a third-round selection.

In 2009, Georgia Tech defeated Clemson 39-34 in the ACC championship game in Tampa, Fla., and then ended the season with a 24-14 loss to Iowa in the Orange Bowl.

The NCAA Committee on Infractions cited Georgia Tech for a lack of cooperation during an investigation, a failure to meet the conditions and obligations of membership, and preferential treatment violations.  The official punishment, according to the NCAA release, included a $100,000 fine, recruiting restrictions, vacation of records, and four years probation.

The football team, specifically, will suffer from the four years probation that will last until July 13, 2015, and the vacation of all contests won by the football team during the 2009 season after November 24, which includes their ACC title game victory over Clemson. Georgia Tech's crimes in the football program stem from a lack of action after being made aware of eligibility questions with a student-athlete.  CBSSports.com was told Thomas and Burnett were involved.

Judging by the phrasing in the report, the NCAA was most upset with Georgia Tech's attitude towards possible violations/investigations.

"The staff members provided, before the NCAA could conduct their interview, information about what would be discussed in the interview," NCAA Committee on Infractions chair Dennis Thomas said. "These actions impeded the enforcement staff investigations and hindered the Committee in getting to the truth in this case. Otherwise this case, as it pertains to the football program, would have been limited to impermissible benefits and preferential treatment violations."

The report from the NCAA goes on to state that the student-athlete in question competed in the final three contests of the 2009.  In this case, several items of clothing (valued at approximately $312) was the culprit.  A friend of a sports agency employee gave the gifts, and thus the student-athlete was ineligible for those contests.

"The championship game that they played in was vacated," Thomas said. "Most people in athletics take that very seriously as a major deterrent for playing ineligible athletes."

Despite the issues with Georgia Tech as an institution during the infractions process, no individuals were penalized as a result of non-cooperation.

"The committee felt that a show cause was not appropriate," Thomas said. "The committee reviewed the evidence and did not feel that anyone needed to be singled out in terms of an individual violation. We looked as it being more of an institutional matter."

"This case provides a cautionary tale of the conduct that member institutions should avoid while under investigation for violations of NCAA rules," the committee stated in its report.

Georgia Tech President G.P. "Bud" Peterson said the school could have done some things differently.

"Georgia Tech is committed to the integrity of its athletics program, including full cooperation and support of the NCAA," Peterson said. "Given the information we had at the time, I believe we took reasonable and appropriate steps to determine the proper course of action and acted in good faith. Looking back, there are things we could have done differently. Because of our unwavering commitment to NCAA compliance, we have already taken a number of steps to address perceived shortcomings, hopefully ensuring that our programs remain beyond reproach."

CBSSports.com's Chip Patterson and Bryan Fischer contributed to this report.


Posted on: July 13, 2011 1:30 pm
 

Another one bites the NCAA infractions dust

And then there were 73.

For the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has been reporting on various elements involved with cheating in college football.

During the series, we had referenced that there had been 72 major violations at 56 schools since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

Well, it’s now up to 73 major infractions and 57 schools after West Virginia's July 8 violations, stemming from failure to monitor charges against former coaches Rich Rodriguez and Bill Stewart, are now included in the database of NCAA infractions.

West Virginia had been one of 23 automatic qualifying BCS conference teams that had not committed a major violation since 1987, so now that number is reduced to 22. That also means 45 of the 67 AQ BCS schools - 67.1 percent of the schools from the six power conferences.

The final and fifth installment of our series is Friday, so it’s doubtful the NCAA would rule on any major infractions before then. But, then again, you never know.

Here’s the updated list of the 22 AQ football programs without a major infraction since 1987:

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt.


 
 
 
 
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