Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Bobby Petrino
Posted on: July 12, 2011 6:08 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2011 7:08 pm
 

Mendenhall receives 3-year extension

PROVO, Utah - BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall will lead the Cougars into the unchartered waters of being an independent and he'll do so with a new contract. Mendendall said Tuesday that he signed a three-year extension through the 2013 season.

"I am absolutely satisfied with my job here and I have been treated more than fairly," Mendenhall said. "I am very realistic. There is a lot on the line going independent, so I want to ensure that I am worthy of my position. I want to give everything I have and lead the charge through independence."

Mendenhall is 56-21 in six seasons with the Cougars and has taken BYU to six consecutive bowl games. His 72.7 winning percentage is tied for seventh among the active FBS coaches with at least five years experience, trailing Boise State's Chris Petersen (92.4 percent), Oklahoma's Bob Stoops (80.6), TCU's Gary Patterson (77.8), Penn State's Joe Paterno (74.8), Utah's Kyle Whittingham (74.0) and Georgia's Mark Richt (73.9). Arkansas' Bobby Petrino is tied with Mendenhall for seventh.

Mendenhall, who took over the defensive coordinator duties midway through last season, also said he will again be BYU's defensive coordinator this season.

"Bronco is an incredible leader and one of hte best coaches in the country," BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe said. "He is committed to the program and we are committed to him as the leader of our football team. Bronco is loyal to this team and the university and does things the right way, on and off the field. We are excited for the future as we begin our journey as an independent."





Posted on: June 1, 2011 4:57 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Spurrier wants players to receive $300 a game

DESTIN, Fla. – South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier said he was battling laryngitis so he had to speak softly. His message, though, was loud and clear: football players should receive financial compensation.

At Wednesday’s SEC spring meetings, Spurrier presented a proposal that league coaches – out of their own pockets – provide $300 a game to its players. The money would be for game expenses.

“They can give to their parents for travel, lodging, meals,” Spurrier said. “Maybe they could take their girlfriends out Saturday night and so forth.”

Spurrier said six other coaches signed his proposal: Alabama’s Nick Saban, Florida’s Will Muschamp, Ole Miss’ Houston Nutt, Mississippi State’s Dan Mullen, LSU’s Les Miles and Tennessee’s Derek Dooley.

“A bunch of us coaches felt so strongly about it we would be willing to pay 70 guys 300 bucks a game,” Spurrier said. “That’s only $21,000 a game. I doubt it will get passed, but as the coaches in the SEC we make all the money as do the universities with television [deals]. And we need to give more to our players. That was something we need to get out there.”

The five coaches who didn’t sign Spurrier’s proposal: Arkansas’ Bobby Petrino, Auburn’s Gene Chizik, Georgia’s Mark Richt, Kentucky’s Joker Phillips and Vanderbilt’s James Franklin.

"I told the other coaches Im going to tell the media what coaches wouldn't sign," Spurrier said.

SEC commissioner Mike Slive said it was doubtful Spurrier’s proposal could ever get passed.

"I don't think [it would pass],” Slive said. “It was a gesture by Steve, thinking about student athlete welfare.”

Spurrier said he’s felt this way for years, especially how much money is made in college athletics by the universities and coaches.

“I just wish there was a way to give our players a little bit piece of the pie,” Spurrier said. “It’s so huge right now. As you know 50 years ago there was not any kind of money and the players got full scholarships. Now they’re still getting full scholarships and the money in the millions.

“I don’t know how to get it done. Hopefully there’s a way to get our guys that play football, a little piece of the pie. The coaches make so much, we ‘d be willing to pay it so there’s no additional expense to the university or anybody.”

Posted on: May 31, 2011 9:51 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 10:50 pm
 

Petrino: NCAA changed its rules for Sugar Bowl

DESTIN, Fla. – Ohio State 31, Arkansas 26.

Not many individuals outside of Arkansas and Ohio remember the score from last season’s Sugar Bowl, but nearly everyone remembers that six Buckeyes were allowed to play in the contest after the NCAA determined they received improper benefits. The NCAA permitted them to play and delayed the player’s suspensions until this fall.

Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino was asked at Tuesday's SEC spring meetings about the Ohio State game and “should you have been playing a different team or have you let it go?”

“We wanted to play their best players,” Petrino said. “When you have a year like we had … and get to a BCS bowl game, you want to play their best players. That’s what you want to do.

“There’s no question that I don’t understand how they were eligible to play in the game. I just don’t and I never will.”

SEC commissioner Mike Slive, when told about Petrino’s comments, responded: “I can understand his position.”

Slive also was asked if he had ever seen a situation before where ineligible players were allowed to play and their suspensions delayed.

"I don't remember one," Slive said.   

Petrino related a situation when he coaching Louisville. He said two of his players were suspended after spending more than their allotted per diem on food because they were stranded in Newport, R.I., following the Big East’s media days. The punishment for the Louisville players was immediate, while, obviously, the OSU players had theirs suspensions postponed allowing them to play in the Sugar Bowl.

“I think they [the NCAA] kind of changed the rules for that bowl game,” Petrino said.

Petrino said he wasn’t surprised by the resignation of Ohio State coach Jim Tressel

“I can’t say I was surprised but I feel for him,” Petrino said. “When something like that happens you never like to see it. I feel for him, his family. It affects a lot of other people in the state and the university, so you feel for all those people.

“There are lessons to be learned from that, no question. One of the talks I have with my players is football is a game of courage. One of the lessons we always talk about is take the arrow in the forehead – which means tell the truth.

“Don’t be trying to blame things on your teammate next you. You have to be able to tell the truth with all your relationships with your professors, your girlfriend. … when it came out [Tressel] was dishonest with the NCAA you kind of knew it was going to spin a lot more.”

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com