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Tag:BCS
Posted on: February 22, 2012 1:28 pm
Edited on: February 22, 2012 3:00 pm
 

BCS statement on meetings: no news

DALLAS - The BCS released a statement Wednesday after the conclusion of its meetings. It didn't say much, but here it is:

"In an effort to grow college football's great popularity and success, we just completed two days of productive meetings in Dallas, Texas. 

"We have until the fall of this year to finalize any possible changes to our current structure. That's when contractual obligations require us to begin negotiations with our television carrier for future coverage decisions. We have a self-imposed deadline of sometime this summer to decide what changes we will propose to our governing bodies for football's post-season. It's still early in our process and we will continue to meet with our conferences and review options.

"Whatever we do, we want to protect college football's regular season which is the best and most meaningful in sports. We want to preserve the great bowl tradition while making it better and more attractive. We also have heard the message about playing bowl games closer to or on January 1, the way it used to be. 

"As we proceed, we will evaluate the many pros and cons of numerous possible changes. Every idea has exciting up sides, as well as complicated consequences. From the realities of the calendar to the issues presented in terms of venues such as who hosts games, we have tremendous responsibilities and opportunities.

"The bottom line is we will continue to talk about how to make a great sport even better for student-athletes, fans and everyone who loves college football."

Category: NCAAF
Tags: BCS
 
Posted on: February 21, 2012 8:00 pm
Edited on: February 21, 2012 8:47 pm
 

BCS plus-one format gains momentum

DALLAS – There are still a myriad of things to determine how the Bowl Championship Series’ postseason format ultimately will look like in 2014, but one topic seems apparent: college football’s playoff will not be larger than four teams.

“I would say obviously eight or 16 team (playoff formats) are not on the radar screen,” said a person attending the four-hour plus BCS meetings Tuesday at the Dallas-Fort Worth Grand Hyatt Hotel.

On Tuesday, the 11 conference commissioners, Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick, two BCS officials and a BCS attorney met to discuss what form college football’s postseason will look like beginning in 2014.

While sources at the meeting said a four-team plus-one format looks likely when the new BCS format starts in two years, BCS executive director Bill Hancock stressed the meetings were “very broad and analytical” and that no decisions were reached.

The group will meet Wednesday then again in Dallas next month and in Fort Lauderdale in April. However, Hancock says he would be surprised if a decision is reached before summer.

“I don’t think this will be an overnight decision,” Hancock said.

Added SEC commissioner Mike Slive: “This is a marathon, not a sprint.”

Maybe so, but when they’re done running there likely will be a four-team playoff.

Now comes the intriguing part: how will the plus-one model look like?

Will it be a seeded model (one vs. four, two vs. three); where will the semifinals be played; and how - or will - the bowl games be utilized? Will the bowl games host the semifinals and final or will the plus-one semifinals and final be awarded to the highest bidder – i.e. the Cotton Bowl or another current non-BCS bowl?

Even with a four-team format some of problems are "insurmountable" according to source in attendance Tuesday. Hancock and others spoke of not wanting to hold BCS games during the December exam period, usually between Dec. 1-21. While FCS (Division I-AA), Division II and III stage playoffs in December, FBS (Division I-A) would be doing it for the first time. The scrutiny would be enhanced on presidents at the highest level of college athletics if football cut into that exam time.

Besides wanting to avoid BCS games during the exam schedule, they also want to avoid playing BCS games around Christmas. Another challenge, Hancock said, is scheduling games around the NFL.

Presidents also want the season to end before the second week of January and closer to Jan. 1. Ohio State has flown back from a BCS championship game site immediately after the game at least once because school had started back home.

Last season's BCS title game between Alabama and LSU was played on Jan. 9 and resulted in the lowest TV ratings in BCS title game history.

Based on those preferred timelines (no exams, no Christmas and no NFL conflicts), the most likely time for a plus-one would be holding the semifinals a few days after Christmas and the final about a week later.

Any changes to the BCS format, which expires after the 2013 regular season, must be approved by the NCAA’s Presidential Oversight Committee, which must decide whether to approve the recommendation of the 11 Football Bowl Subdivision commissioners and Swarbrick.
Category: NCAAF
Tags: BCS, NCAA, plus-one
 
Posted on: December 8, 2011 11:43 am
Edited on: December 8, 2011 1:16 pm
 

BCS AQ status likely gone in 2014

NEW YORK – For all the critics of the BCS, rejoice: it appears that the BCS automatic qualifying status format will be gone in 2014.

At least that’s the indication that Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany and Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky gave during Thursday’s IMG Forum at the Marriott Marquis.

“Some of the people that don’t have (BCS AQ status), say they don’t want it,” Delany said. “Some of the people that do have it, don’t really care about it. Maybe it needs to be reconsidered. I’m not wed to it. I’m wed to the 1-2 game and I’m wed to the Rose Bowl. I’m not wed to the (BCS AQ) selection process or the limitations.”

The current BCS format expires after the 2013 season. There is growing speculation that when the new format is voted on and established in 2014, it could simply be reduced to only pitting the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in a bowl game or a Plus-One model (the top four teams would be seeded in the bowl games).

Either the Plus-One or without the Plus-One model would allow the other current BCS bowl games – Fiesta, Sugar, Orange and Rose – to simply align with whichever conferences they want and would not be required to select teams based on a BCS ranking.

"I feel strongly it’s been a negative driver from our perspective,” Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky. “I hope to be involved in a BCS we do it in a way where we can create a more happy BCS without these class systems. I think it’s possible to do it. In a competitive format that requires teams to be competitive teams in order to participate.”

Added Delany: “As long as I can go to the Rose Bowl, I don’t really care,” Delany said.

Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick isn't in favor of the Plus-One model, but expects change in 2014.

“(Without the BCS AQ format) takes so many forms, it's hard to draw a conclusion from that," Swarbrick said. "You could fashion a version which probably would be good. It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to fashion a version that might not be good."

Posted on: August 17, 2011 7:42 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 8:34 pm
 

Fiesta Bowl likely on the move - to Jan. 2, 2012

The Fiesta Bowl likely is moving – to another date.

The game could be moved up three days to Monday, Jan. 2, 2012 at 8:30 ET, sources told CBSSports.com.

Because of the uncertainty of the NFL lockout earlier this summer, the BCS only scheduled the Rose Bowl on Monday, Jan. 2, 2010 (5 p.m. ET) and didn’t schedule a game that night in case the NFL regular season schedule was pushed back a week and was required to play that night.

However, with the lockout settled and the NFL regular season schedule remaining the same – it ends on Jan. 1, 2012 – the Sugar, Orange and Fiesta bowls were given the opportunity by the BCS to move one of their games up to Monday night, Jan. 2.

The Sugar, which also hosts the BCS title game on Jan. 9, 2012, had the first opportunity but decided to remain on its original date of Jan. 3, 2012. The Orange also turned down an opportunity to move off Jan. 4, 2012.

The Fiesta Bowl, originally scheduled for Jan. 5, 2012, wants to make the move to Jan. 2, 2012, because it would draw higher television ratings by having a Rose Bowl lead-in game compared with playing on a Thursday night. Also since Jan. 2, 2012 is recognized as a holiday, it would be more easier for visiting fans to attend.

A Fiesta Bowl spokesman declined comment on the expected move.

The Arizona Republic reported the holdup whether the Fiesta Bowl will be moved depends on if the NFL's Arizona Cardinals, who host the Seattle Seahawks on Jan. 1, will waive part of its stadium rights for crews to transform the stadium immediately after the game for the Fiesta Bowl. A Cardinals spokesman said told the Republic the Cardinals want to explore ways to make it happen. The NFL game is now scheduled for 4:15 p.m. ET at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz.

Ironically, all three BCS bowl games that had the option to move also are hosting NFL games on Jan. 1. The N.Y. Jets play at Miami at Sun Life Stadium, Carolina visits New Orleans in the Louisiana Superdome and the Seahawks play the Cardinals in Glendale.

Here is the BCS bowl schedule if the Fiesta Bowl moves as expected:

Monday, Jan. 2, 2012–Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., 5 p.m. ET
Monday, Jan. 2, 2012–Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz., 8:30 p.m. ET
Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012–Sugar Bowl in New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. ET
Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2012–Orange Bowl in Miami Gardens, 8 p.m. ET
Monday, Jan. 9, 2012–BCS title game in New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. ET




Posted on: August 17, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 1:36 pm
 

Emmert: no conference realignment summit

After NCAA president Mark Emmert read erroneous media reports that he planned to have a summit on conference realignment, he emailed several officials throughout intercollegiate athletics to clarify no meetings would take place.

CBSSports.com obtained the document Emmert sent out.

"I have been and will continue to engage individual presidents and commissioners about the reform effort that was launched last week as part of the Division I presidential retreat," Emmert wrote. "In that context, all constituents have been involved in meaningful discussion on how best to conduct our business, including conference realignments, in the best interests of student-athletes. Open and frank discussion is needed to ensure expected reforms are not derailed in any way. However, I have not proposed, nor do I have plans to propose a summit on conference realignment as recently reported by several media outlets. Such reports are simply in error."

Getting all the key players from the SEC, Big 12, Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC and Big East conferences together to discuss conference realignment would seem like a good idea for the future of college athletics. But an NCAA spokesman said that was never a consideration.

"Conference affilations are the purview of the conferences not the NCAA," said Bob Williams, the NCAA's vice president of communications.

I asked Williams if there also were legal reasons why Emmert wouldn't meet with the BCS conference commissioners.

"Antitrust is always an issue," he said.

Posted on: July 20, 2011 3:00 pm
 

Slive says you can win without cheating

HOOVER, Ala. – In the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has reported in depth on cheating in college athletics. And even since the series began three more schools – West Virginia, Georgia Tech and LSU – have received major NCAA sanctions.

So I posed the question Wednesday to SEC commissioner Mike Slive that our series sought out to answer: Can you win in college football these days without cheating?

The commissioner’s answer: “Yes.”

“There’s a tendency to overstate – if there’s a school on probation for phone calls or text messaging, you’re going to lump that in with another school who might had done something very different,” Slive said.

“We need to figure out what we really want to stop and go from there.”

In the past 25 years, SEC programs have committed the most NCAA major infractions of any conference. Since 1987, every SEC football program, except for Vanderbilt, has received a major infraction.

SEC football programs are hardly the only guilty parties. Since 1987, only 21 of the 67 automatic qualifying BCS conference schools have not committed a major infraction. That number likely will reduce to 20 after the NCAA rules on the various allegations concerning North Carolina.


Posted on: July 12, 2011 4:10 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2011 5:58 pm
 

BYU doesn't deserve automatic BCS access - yet

PROVO, Utah - Since BYU joined the indepedent ranks, should the Cougars now receive automatic access to a BCS bowl like Notre Dame?

BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe says not yet.

“I don’t think we deserve the same access as Notre Dame,” Holmoe said. “I don’t. I just have an incredible amount of respect for Notre Dame. What they have accomplished over decades and decades. I’m not talking 20-30 years, I’m talking about 100.

“The BCS folks brought them in at even keel and I agree with that. They belong. It’s their responsibility once they’re there to continue to be good.”

Leaving the Mountain West should give the Cougars a better shot at reaching a BCS bowl, though, Holmoe said.

“You have to start winning games,” Holmoe said. “TCU, Boise State and Utah – as hard as it is for me to say that – they’ve earned respect of the nation by going to BCS games and winning. I think if we play well – we’re going to have a better schedule now than in the Mountain West – if we can be undefeated with our schedule, we’ll be in a BCS game.”

The Cougars are one of only seven Football Bowl Subdivision programs to win 10 or more games in at least four of the past five seasons. But that won’t mean anything from here on out: especially with future schedules featuring games against Texas, Ole Miss, Utah, Oregon State, Notre Dame, Georgia Tech and West Virginia.

“If we win, we’ll get noticed and we’ll earn people’s respect and people will take notice,” Holmoe said. “I think we belong in a BCS conference, but I’m not going to kick anybody out and we haven't been invited. There’s reasons we haven’t been invited.”

Posted on: June 20, 2011 1:13 pm
Edited on: June 20, 2011 1:34 pm
 

Big East received more $ from hoops than BCS

In case you need more evidence that basketball is truly king in the Big East, here’s another example. The league received more money in 2011 in NCAA tournament revenue ($24.9 million) than it did in BCS football revenue ($21.2 million).

The Big East’s $24.9 million received from the NCAA was about $6 million more than the Big 12, the next closest conference. The NCAA basketball revenue is based on number of “tournament units.” For each round a league team advances it receives another unit. Each unit is worth about $240,000.

Even though the Big East earned the most revenue, the Big Ten had the highest per-team average at $1.67 million, followed by the Pac-10 ($1.6 million), Big 12 ($1.575 million), Big East ($1.55 million), ACC ($1.51 million) and SEC ($1.29 million).

Here’s the breakdown of the 2011 distribution of NCAA basketball revenue by conference

1. Big East $24.9 million
2. Big 12 $18.9 million
3. Big Ten $18.4 million
4. ACC $18.2 million
5. Pac-10 $16 million

6. SEC $15.5 million
7. Conference USA $6.9 million
8. Missouri Valley $5 million
(tie). Mountain West $5 million
10. Atlantic 10 $5.7 million

11. Horizon $4.5 million
(tie). West Coast $4.5 million
13. Colonial $3.3 million
14. WAC $2.8 million
15. Sun Belt $2.3 million
16. Southern $2.1 million

17. Big West $1.9 million
(tie). Ivy $1.9 million
(tie). Metro $1.9 million
(tie). Ohio Valley $1.9 million
(tie). Patriot $1.9

22. America East $1.6 million
(tie). Big Sky $1.6 million
(tie). Big South $1.6 million
(tie). MAC $1.6 million
(tie). Northeast $1.6 million
(tie). Southland $1.6 million
(tie). SWAC $1.6 million

29. Atlantic Sun $1.4 million
(tie). MEAC $1.4 million
(tie). Summit $1.4 million


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com