Posted on: March 12, 2012 11:22 am
 

It's true: I'm moving

Yes, I'm moving, and no, I'm not a casualty of conference realignment.

Okay, so I'm not really going anywhere, but McMurphy's Law is headed to a new site here at CBSSports.com.

We have this - and I quote - "new, snazzy blog" (that's what CBSSports.com is officially calling it, by the way). So if you're a glutton for punishment and still want to read up on latest in college football, you can find me here.

Thanks for reading.


Category: NCAAF
Posted on: March 7, 2012 7:35 pm
Edited on: March 7, 2012 7:40 pm
 

Big East "open" to Pitt, Syracuse leaving early

The Big East will consider allowing Pittsburgh and Syracuse to leave the league for the ACC a year early in 2013, Big East commissioner John Marinatto said Wednesday.

College football industry sources told CBSSports.com that "there is no doubt" Pittsburgh and Syracuse will be in the ACC in 2013. It's just a question of what type of additional compensation the Big East would require from each school.

Marinatto’s stance is a complete reversal from the league's viewpoint since Pittsburgh and Syracuse announced in September they were leaving the Big East for the ACC. He has stressed continually both schools would have to remain until July 1, 2014 because "the by-laws are the by-laws are the by-laws" when explaining why both schools should remain in the Big East for the full 27 months.

When Pittsburgh and Syracuse gave their notice they were leaving the league, the Big East's exit agreement required a $5 million buyout and 27 months notice. West Virginia was allowed to leave for the Big 12 with less than a year's notice by reaching a $20 million settlement with the Big East.

“Our membership, given the speed and success of our expansion initiatives, I think it’s open to having the discussions with both Pittsburgh and Syracuse about them having an early departure,” Marinatto said. “So we haven't actually had those conversations yet, but our membership is certainly willing to do that at this point given where we've landed.”

The reason the Big East is more receptive to letting them out in 2013, instead of 2014, is with the addition of Temple and its other recent additions, the Big East would have 20 basketball members in the 2013-14 school year if Pittsburgh and Syracuse remained in the league. Without Pittsburgh and Syracuse in 2013, the Big East still would have 18 basketball members.

ACC commissioner John Swofford told CBSSports.com last month when the league announced what divisions Pittsburgh and Syracuse would compete in when they join, that the ACC was ready to add both schools as soon as they were able to leave the Big East – whether that’s in 2013 or 2014.

“The fact we made our decision how we will schedule and compete certainly helps us [when they join],” Swofford said last month. “In terms of when that time may come, I don’t want to get into a hypothetical of this or that. Our position continues to be that we want to prepare ourselves when they’re ready and it’s appropriate for them to join us.”

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: March 7, 2012 4:24 pm
 

MAC reorganizes after Temple departure

Since 2007, the Mid-American Conference had somehow avoided the musical chairs that is better known as conference realignment.

That all changed on Wednesday when Temple officially announced it was leaving the MAC to join the Big East Conference.

The Owls had been football members of the MAC since 2007, but will join the Big East as an all sports member. Temple’s football team joins this fall, while its Olympic sports won’t join the Big East until the 2013-14 school year.

“I don’t think it was any secret they wanted to be in the Big East,” MAC commissioner Jon Steinbrecher told CBSSports.com . “But it took a lot of interesting circumstances in the last 12-16 months to set in motion what happened.”

What happened – at least this is the cliff notes version – is the Big East lost West Virginia and TCU to the Big 12 for this fall and Pittsburgh and Syracuse to the ACC in either 2013 or 2014. The Big East was left with only seven football members and had to add Temple to have an eight-team conference this fall.

Temple and the MAC reached a $6 million settlement – more than double the $2.5 million required for a team providing at least two year’s notice. Temple also will pay the Atlantic 10 $1 million for removing its Olympic sports before the 2013-14 season.

With the loss of Temple the MAC moved Bowling Green from the MAC West to the MAC East. The MAC will have 13 football members this fall.

The seven-team East will consist of Akron, Bowling Green, Buffalo, Kent State, UMass (which makes the move up from the FCS ranks), Miami (Ohio) and Ohio. The six-team West will consist of Ball State, Central Michigan, Eastern Michigan, Northern Illinois, Toledo and Western Michigan.

Despite the loss of Temple, Steinbrecher said the MAC is not looking to immediately add another team.

“We’ll take a deep breath and watch and see whatever occurs and evolves [on the conference landscape] and make our decisions based on what’s best for the Mid-American Conference,” Steinbrecher said. “Our core membership is very solid.”

MAC teams will play eight game conference schedules this fall. The schedule is expected to be released in the coming weeks, Steinbrecher said.


Posted on: March 7, 2012 10:38 am
Edited on: March 7, 2012 7:23 pm
 

Big East adds Temple as an all sports member

Temple’s football program is returning to the Big East this fall, sources told CBSSports.com.

The Big East’s presidents voted Wednesday morning to add the Owls as all-sports members, but only Temple’s football program will join in 2012. The Owls’ Olympic sports won’t join the Big East until a year later for the 2013-14 school year.

The Big East officially announced Temple's move in a Wednesday press conference.

A source told CBSSports.com that the Big East will pay for the Owls' $7 million in exit fees. Temple must pay the Mid-American Conference $6 million and the Atlantic 10 $1 million.

Temple was an original member of the Big East’s football conference from 1991-2004 until it was dismissed from the league for not being competitive and unable to meet certain financial requirements.

The Big East already had received a commitment from Temple that the Owls would join the Big East in football in 2012, sources told CBSSports.com last week. But the Big East had its presidents formally rubberstamp it in Wednesday’s meeting in New York.

After Temple’s dismissal from the Big East, the Owls were an independent for two seasons before joining the Mid-American Conference in 2007. Temple will pay the MAC $6 million to leave with less than one year's notice. The Philadelphia Inquirer first reported that amount, which is more than double what MAC by-laws require teams to pay ($2.5 million) with two year’s notice.

Temple also must pay the Atlantic 10, where its Olympic sports compete, $1 million to leave after next season. It would have cost $2 million to leave before this season.

The addition of Temple was crucial for the Big East which needed an eighth football program to replace West Virginia, which joins the Big 12 this summer. Without West Virginia, the Big East’s teams would have had only six conference games each. With Temple, each Big East team will have seven league games – as it has since 2005.

If the Owls take West Virginia’s place on the Big East schedule, the Owls will have Big East home games against Syracuse, Rutgers, Cincinnati and South Florida and league road games at UConn, Pittsburgh and Louisville. The Big East's football schedule should be released in the coming days.

The Big East initially wanted Boise State, which will join the league in 2013, to join the Big East in 2012. However, the Broncos could not afford to pay the approximate $10 million in exit fees to leave the Mountain West and WAC early and the Big East was not willing to pay for the Broncos’ early move, sources told CBSSports.com.

The addition of Temple, which shares its home stadium at Lincoln Financial Field with the Philadelphia Eagles, gives the Big East three teams that play their home games in an NFL stadium. The others are Pittsburgh/Pittsburgh Steelers and South Florida/Tampa Bay Bucs.

With Temple on board in 2012, the Big East’s football membership this fall will consist of Cincinnati, UConn, Louisville, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, South Florida, Syracuse and Temple. The 15-team basketball membership in 2012-13 will consist of: Cincinnati, UConn, Louisville, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, South Florida, Syracuse, DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Notre Dame, Providence, Seton Hall, St. John’s and Villanova.

The reason Temple's Olympic sports didn't join the Big East until 2013 was for logistical reasons.

"We're using the current year as a transition year in order to analyze what we can by hiring a consultant to explore how we can best exploit the marketplace moving forward," Big East commissioner John Marinatto said. "And as I said earlier, to retain each school's individual identity, a brand that Villanova has worked on for over three decades with the Big East and how to incorporate and associate that with Temple.

"So for the next 12 months, what we're going to do is with the two institutions, the conference's initiative, explore how we best move forward in order to ensure that we accomplish that because it's in the best interest of the conference obviously for the two schools to coexist in a very, very positive way, and one of the things we want to do is ensure that's the case by doing this."

The league will look much different in the 2013-14 school year. The football league could consist of up to 14 schools: Boise State, Cincinnati, UConn, Houston, Louisville, Memphis, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, San Diego State, SMU, South Florida, Syracuse, Temple and UCF. However, Pittsburgh and Syracuse, who are scheduled to leave for the ACC in 2014, want to exit the Big East in 2013. If they do leave early, it would drop the football membership to 12 schools.

If Pittsburgh and Syracuse remain in the Big East until 2014, the Big East's basketball league in 2013-14 would consist of 20 teams: Cincinnati, UConn, Houston, Louisville, Memphis, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, South Florida, SMU, Syracuse, Temple, UCF, DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Notre Dame, Providence, Seton Hall, St. John’s and Villanova. That number would be reduced to 18 basketball members if Pittsburgh and Syracuse left early.

Also, Navy will join the Big East as a football-only member in 2015.



Posted on: March 2, 2012 2:58 pm
 

Temple to Big East after it settles with MAC

Temple has given the Big East a verbal agreement it will join the league in 2012, but an official announcement can not be made until the Owls finalize their settlement to leave the Mid-American Conference, sources told CBSSports.com.

The Big East wants to make the announcement that Temple is joining by Monday so it won’t conflict with the Big East men’s basketball tournament, which starts Tuesday in New York. Whether it will happen that quickly depends on the Owls’ negotiations with the MAC.

The MAC’s exit fee is $2.5 million for schools that provide two years notice. However, there is no specific penalty for a school leaving with less than two years notice, a source told CBSSports.com. 

Temple was a Big East football-only member from 1991-2004 and the plan was for Temple to join the Big East in all sports in 2012. The Owls' football program competes in the MAC and their Olympic sports are in the Atlantic 10 Conference. To leave the Atlantic 10 with less than a year’s notice costs $2 million, a source said, while it’s $1 million if more than a year’s notice is given.

Because of the difference in exit fees Temple would pay the A-10, there remains a possibility Temple could join the Big East in football this fall, but its Olympic sports wouldn’t join the Big East until 2013. 

MAC commissioner Jon Steinbrecher and Big East commissioner John Marinatto declined comment.

The reason the Big East needs Temple in its football league this fall is to replace West Virginia, which left for the Big 12, on the conference schedule. Without West Virginia, the Big East would have only seven league members and six conference games. With Temple, it will have eight schools and seven league games. 

On Friday, Syracuse released its complete five-game non-conference schedule. The Big East has told league schools that they will play seven conference games, meaning an additional member would be added for this fall.

“The Big East has to assist us with that (seventh) conference game, whatever that is,” Syracuse said deputy athletic director Herman Frazier told the Syracuse Post-Standard. 

Frazier told the Post-Standard he expects the Big East to make an announcement in the next seven to 10 days.

However, it will happen much quicker if the Owls can hammer out a settlement with the MAC.

Temple’s Board of Trustees met on Wednesday to discuss the Owls’ “contracts,”  the Temple News reported.


Posted on: March 1, 2012 6:42 pm
 

Sources: Florida not ready to end LSU series

While LSU athletic director Joe Alleva said that the Tigers and Florida are both “interested in ending” their annual series, Florida sources told CBSSports.com that the Gators have given no indication they want their series to end with LSU.

The Tigers and Gators have met annually since 1971 and were designated as permanent cross-divisional rivals when the SEC expanded in 1992. With the addition of Missouri and Texas A&M, the league is considering doing away with the cross-divisional games, including Florida-LSU, Auburn-Georgia and Alabama-Tennessee.

Alleva told the Baton Rouge (La.) Advocate the Tigers and Gators were interested in ending their series, but Florida sources disputed that to CBSSports.com.

Florida athletic director Jeremy Foley could not be reached for comment Thursday.

Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity also told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that there’s a possibility the Bulldogs’ rivalry with Auburn, which dates back to 1892, could be in jeopardy.


Category: NCAAF
Posted on: March 1, 2012 2:13 pm
 

SEC loves (playing) the Sun Belt

While Thursday’s release of the Sun Belt’s 2012 football schedule didn’t bring as much fanfare as the SEC or Big 12 schedule release, it did give us a chance to look at which other conferences love the Sun Belt. Specifically which of the other 10 FBS conferences love playing against the Sun Belt.

And no one loves playing/beating the Sun Belt more than the SEC, especially Mississippi State.

Three of the Bulldogs' four non-conference games are against Sun Belt members Troy, South Alabama and Middle Tennessee. Their fourth non-conference game is against FCS member Jackson State. I guess there were no Division III teams available that week.

Anyway, Mississippi State is among nine SEC schools that will play Sun Belt schools this fall in a total of 12 non-conference games. The only SEC schools without a Sun Belt team on the schedule is Missouri, Ole Miss, South Carolina, Texas A&M and Vanderbilt. Defending national champion Alabama’s schedule features two Sun Belt opponents: Western Kentucky and Florida Atlantic.

After the SEC, Conference USA has the most schools (six) playing Sun Belt opponents with a total of eight games.

Mississippi State is one of five schools with multiple Sun Belt opponents. Alabama, Memphis, Tulane and Navy each have two Sun Belt non-conference games.

The only FBS league that isn’t playing the Sun Belt is the WAC.

Last year, the Sun Belt was only 10-25 in non-conference games against FBS opponents, including a 1-2 bowl record.

Conference (games vs. Sun Belt)

ACC (3):
Duke, Georgia Tech, N.C. State
Big East (1):
Louisville
Big 10 (1):
Nebraska
Big 12 (3):
Baylor, Kansas State, Oklahoma State
C-USA (6):
Houston, Memphis 2, Southern Miss, Tulane 2, UAB, UCF
Independents (1):
Navy 2
MAC (1):
Akron
Mountain West (1):
Hawaii
SEC (9):
Alabama 2, Arkansas, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi State 3, Tennessee
Pac-12 (1):
Oregon
WAC (0)

Posted on: February 28, 2012 5:30 pm
Edited on: February 28, 2012 5:33 pm
 

Report: Temple to discuss Big East invite

Temple's Board of Trustees will meet via conference call Wednesday afternoon in which they could accept an invitation to become an all sports member of the Big East Conference, CSNPhilly.com reported.

Last week, CBSSports.com reported Temple would likely join the Big East in 2012 in all sports and an announcement could happen as early as this week.

Temple currently is a football member in the Mid-American Conference and the Owls' Olympic sports are members of the Atlantic 10. It would cost Temple $2 million to leave the Atlantic 10 with less than one year's notice and at least $2.5 million to leave the MAC, sources told CBSSports.com

"This (board meeting) is driven by the 2012 football schedule," Patrick J. O’Connor, Chairman of Temple’s Board of Trustees told CSNPhilly.com. "Because of that, decisions have to be made. There are time considerations."

That's because the Big East desperately needs a replacement for West Virginia on the 2012 football schedule. West Virginia agreed on a $20 million settlement with the Big East to leave for the Big 12, but the Big East was unwilling to pay Boise State's approximate $10 million in exit fees to leave the Mountain West and WAC a year early. Boise State was unable to pay that amount as well, so the Big East then turned its attention to Temple.

The Owls would give the Big East eight football members and 16 basketball members in 2012. School officials were miffed last month when the Big East extended an invitation to Memphis and not Temple. The Owls were Big East football members from 1991-2004 before being dismissed from the league for not being competitive and not meeting certain financial requirements.

"I think we were a natural choice to join the Big East months ago," O'Connor told CSNPhilly.com. "It baffles me that they let in some of the schools they did before Temple."
    
O'Connor added that Temple would only make the move to the Big East "if it (financially) is a net positive, we’ll do it. We’re not going to spend money to lose money.

"The Board’s job is to make a decision that impacts all of Temple’s students," O'Connor told CSNPhilly.com. "It will affect where we are (athletically) over the next five to 10 years. It’s a matter of where we want to be. We have two world-class coaches in football (Steve Addazio) and men’s basketball (Fran Dunphy) and they belong on a national stage."

 
 
 
 
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